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Fri Apr 24, 2015 3:19 pm

Großer Generalstab
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Mainz, July 1914



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


This half-monthly report will present Your Imperial and Royal Majesty with the most important strategic plans and proceedings on the Empires various fronts. The Entente is controlled by Paul and Jolly Roger.

The Generalstab has decided to follow the Schlieffen Plan. The KuK Generalstab has decided, despite our strongest urging to concentrate their forces against Russia in Galicia, to move against Serbia in nearly full force. Von Hötzendorf has indicated, that he will place just three Austrian Armies on the Gallician side of the Karpathians.

I will mark important Armies and Korps with their respective numbers, so that Your Majesty can recognize them on the map. I won't be able, due limitations in the size of maps, to mark the route of every Korps. Moving Korps will receive a thicker frame than stationary Korps.
I'm sure Your Majesty understands.


German Plan:

[ATTACH]33458[/ATTACH]


Austrian Plan:

[ATTACH]33459[/ATTACH]


Westfront:

On the Franco-German border, Armies under the command of Albrecht von Würtemberg (IV), Kronprinz Wilhelm (V), Kronprinz Ruprecht (VI) and Josias von Heeringen (VII) are forming up along the Mosel. We expect the French Army to go on the offensive as soon as hostilities commence. During prior years, military theory has been greatly influenced by students of Bergsons concept of "Elan Vitale". We therefore expect, what French Manuals call an "Offensive à Outrence" - an offensive, no matter what. The strength of our fortifications as well as the defensiveness of the terrain will greatly aid in receiving and repulsing the expected French onslaught.


Belgian Front:

Belgium has denied our request for military access. Therefore, the Armies of Generals von Kluck, von Bülow and von Hausen are instructed to overwhelm the Belgian fortifications as quickly as possible. They must force their way through Belgium and the Ardennes. Von Kluck will advance on the outer right flank, circle around Paris and drive the French towards our forces on the Mosel. Speed is of the utmost importance. We shall see, how the situation developes once reality strikes at our plans.


East Prussian Front:

Reports from Petrograd and the Russian borderlands indicate, that the Czar has ordered the mobilization of his armies.
With East Prussia - the farms and lands of our ancestors in great peril - I propose the immediate formation of an Army (VIII) in Königsberg to be commanded
by Generaloberst Max von Prittwitz. The Reports furthermore suggest concentrations of Russian forces at the Fortress cities of Kowno, Grodno and Pultusk.
As of this moment, there is no further information.


Silesian Front:

The Russian principality of Poland forms a great salient surrounded by Prussia to the north and northwest, Silesia to it's west and Galicia in the south. This
vulnerability must be exploited. News reached us, that enemy formations are gathering in Lodz and Warsaw. We know nothing of their strength.
I therefore ordered two Korps to be assembled in both Forts on the Oder; Breslau and Posen.


Galician and Serbian Front:

Von Hötzendorf has so far told me little about his plans. As of right now, three Austrian Armies are gathering in the Fortresses beyond the Karpatians.
Two Armies are gathering on the Austro-Serbian border, ready to strike.


You shall receive the next report in Early August, Your Majesty



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
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Schlieffen Plan.jpg

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Fri Apr 24, 2015 3:20 pm

Großer Generalstab
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Mainz, Early August 1914



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


The German Armies are on the march. In Poland, Russia, Serbia, France and Belgium, the boots of our brave soldiers leave the earth trembling. In the meantime, the Navy assembles in Wilhelmshaven and Kiel. Various raiders are already out at sea to harass the enemies shipping operations.

Mobilization commences as planned. Reports indicate that the train schedules - directing transportation of newly raised divisions to the fronts - are being executed in perfect fashion and are working as precise as swiss clockwork. More and more men are flocking to the banners and Reserve Divisions are called up. The latter, Your Imperial Majesty, will play a major role in our plans. Germany must strongly rely on the courage and zeal of the non-professional to survive the struggle for it's survival.

Now, I shall adress each front individually to give Your Imperial Majesty an overview of the progress of operations.


Westfront:

The Armies of Kronprinz Wilhelm and Rupprecht (V & VI) and the Army of von Heeringen (VII) have not yet fully mobilized. I have asigned priority to the matter. A French attack is to be expected and the Armies must be in shape to repel it. I have ordered von Mudra and his Württembergian Army from Metz to Mühlhausen; Heeringen's Army can not, in it's current weak state, defend the most southern crossing of our Front. Mudra is not famous for his defensive mind, but we must take our chances. I initially deemed his force insufficient, but I do not want to weaken the center any further until French intentions are revealed and the least Mudra can achieve is to delay a French advance. Meanwhile, the II. Bavarian Korps will advance from Morhange into the Valley of the Mosel, to scout French movements around Nancy.

[ATTACH]33488[/ATTACH]



Belgian Front

Your Imperial Majesty must excuse the flurry of color I had to employ to draw our troops movements on the map of small Belgium. As our right wing moves to strike, there are almost more Korps than there are colors to mark their routes. I hope Your Imperial Majesty excuses, that I currently do not have the time to describe the movement of every single Korps. Therefore, I shall outline the elements of the general plan thus far. Bülow (II) has been sent the most heavy Artillery and should prepare to assault the fortifications as we speak. The remaining Korps as well as Kluck (I) are to stay clear and pursue an advance deeper into Belgian territory. This is a gamble. Liege is a stout fortress, yet there remains nothing but to trust Bülow to the fullest. The Plan must be executed speedily and may not be delayed by long sieges including more than single elements of our Force.

I have ordered to strike at Lille swiftly, to occupy Brüssel and the important railway hubs of Belgium, otherwise any advance made by Kluck and his four Korps is meaningless. Napoleon might have been French, but he was still right; an army does march on it's stomach. Horse and Men require enormous amounts of fodder daily, as well as munitions. If we can not secure the railroads, there is no way for us to supply them sufficiently.

Farther South, von Hausen (III) is assembling his Army. His Korps are spread out too far to strike at the French with satisfying odds of success. I have ordered the Railroads to be cut at Guise, Montmedy and Briey. We must prohibit transport of French reinforcements on interior lines at this crucial point. Their rail network is not yet up to full capacity, therefore we must make transport as expensive as possible to hinder further movement.

[ATTACH]33489[/ATTACH]



East Prussian Front:

Two Russian Armies under Rennenkampf (Wladislavov) and Samsonov (Mlawa) have revealed themselves. Unfortunately, Von Prittwitz's (VIII) has not finished mobilization. The speed and force of the Russian advance is disconcerning. I have ordered Francois (I) to the Memel to guard the flank, the Korps of your old riding master Mackensen (XVII) has advanced to Gumbinnen. He must hold back the Russians until the VIII Army arrives. Von Scholtz (XX) has been ordered to Lötzen and Below's Reserve Korps to Thorn. We must not forget that France has priority. For now.

No important movements on the Silesian front as of yet. One of our Recon pilots brought reports from a Russian Army assembling in Warsaw, but we do not know who commands it. Unfortunately, there was no more room for a map of Silesia to be attached. The bag apparently is restricted to five (fashioned by french manufacturers of course). The two pilots reported, that they encountered a Russian plane during their mission. Fortunately, our plane's co-pilot was equipped with a Rifle. The Russian plane was downed as it's pilot was shot dead at close range. Maybe there is a way to equip our planes with offensive gear. Aerial Recon operations are of great worth, as is as hindering the enemy to fly his own. I hear that there is an able engineer by the name of Fokker with some ideas to that regard. I believe, he sent a design before the outbreak of the war, but the Navy requisitioned the funds instead.

[ATTACH]33490[/ATTACH]



Galician Front:

We have finally received word from Conrad, concerning his plans in this theater. Two Austrian Armies are mustering; one under Von Komarow (IV) in Czernowitz and the other in Lemberg under Brudermann (V). They are in the final stages and will soon be ready to commence operations. Meanwhile, Conrad ordered the IX Korps to Kolmea, to guard the railroad through the Karpathians.

I do not greatly trust the Austrians. Their equipment is outdated, not standardized. They have to produce shell and ball for an endless variety of ancient Artillery. Although both our nations have stacked sufficient amounts of shell to get us through the first half year of the war, later production might prove difficult.

Most importantly, there are too many different nationalities within the Austro-Hungarian Armies; literate Czech city dwellers, Austrian farmers, Hungarian landowners, Ruthenian and Galician peasants and Polish landfolk and with every one nationality comes an individual language. Conrad himself is quite fluent in almost 7 of them I believe. German is the language of service, but only a few words are required to be learned by the common soldier. Officers end up learning their men's language, but they are usually the first to be shot on the field of battle. We must hope that the Austro-Hungarians can be of any assistance to us in the long run.

[ATTACH]33491[/ATTACH]



Serbian Front:

In a letter, Conrad lightly rerefered to the fortress of Belgrade as a clump of stone, to collapse under the impact of the first or second shell. I have been to Belgrade before the war, as I know you have, Your Imperial Majesty. Belgrade is a magnificent Fort on the confluent of the Sava river, which will make an Austrian conquest even harder. Yet, Conrad doesn't seem concerned. Even the absence of two Skoda siege mortars (they have been lent to us to bombard Liege) doesn't seem to dampen his excellent spirits. In his mind, he has won the war already.

In Neu-Satz, the Austrian base of operations in that theater, von Frank (I) has been recalled to Vienna. Conrad has as of yet refused to manage affairs from the Front. It's rumored that another man's wife is the cause of his extended stay in the capital. Further South, Potoriek (II) is also recalled to Vienna, to officially receive his commission. The nerve on Conrad! The war has started and he has to recall his Generals to the capital to issue the appointment to Army command.

The two Korps of the V Army have been ordered to Peterwardein, to occupy positions closer to the border. I suggested that the VII Korps of Meixner be railed from Budapest to Bazias and cross the Morava river immediately to occupy the Iron Gates, a direct railroad line into the Serbian Hinterlands. Potoriek's two Corps have been ordered to leave the Depot on the border for Janje and Kusace. The Serbian Army is well hardened by the previous wars and fights on difficult home terrain. It took me hours to persuade Conrad to abandon his plan to order his Armies into Serbia directly. Both Korps, Von Appels (XV) and Von Wurm's (XVI) will make sure that they are not cut off by a swift Serbian advance. Kummer's Army Group has been ordered to Sarajevo.

The Serbian General, Putnik, had been caught vacationing in Austria when the war broke out in July. He was allowed to journey home. Whatever Conrad's qualities as a Commander may be, there is one thing he does not lack; a sense of honor.

[ATTACH]33492[/ATTACH]


You shall receive the next report in Late August, Your Majesty



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg
Westfront.jpg

Bismarck1940
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Sat Apr 25, 2015 11:19 am

Can't wait! :)

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Byrd
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Sat Apr 25, 2015 12:06 pm

Thank you kindly.

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Sun Apr 26, 2015 1:19 am

Nice AAR, can't wait till the next part!

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Sun Apr 26, 2015 2:04 pm

Großer Generalstab
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Mainz, Late August 1914



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty



Sire, as of now, situation reports from the various fronts reach me almost hourly by plane or horse. I've therefore compiled this thorough report, to keep Your Imperial Majesty au courant with operations of Your Armies. I've also received letters from the Reich's Foreign Secretary and the Secretary of the Navy. I shall include a quick summary for Your Majestys plaesir.

Several Ambassadors have been handed their papers, a reaction to the Declarations of War. Pourtalès returned from Russia yesterday; apparently, he is on his way to Mainz carrying with him vital information about the Russian Army. Ambassador von Schön has been expelled from France. He reports that French papers have so far completely ignored our presence in Belgium, which seems, considering the German force on the march, astonishing. But I shall not complain. We must hope that the French, despite minor skirmishes in the Ardennes and Belgium, focus on the Mosel instead.

Tirpitz informed me, that in the Atlantic, the German raiders "Amazone" and "Karlsruhe" have been sunk by a British fleet. Various raiders under the command of von Spee have escaped. Meanwhile, the Admirals seem hesitant to put Your Imperial Majestys beloved Great Fleet out to sea. If your Majesty could urge Tirpitz I would be eternally greatful. The blockade must be broken before the British and French combine their fleets.



Westfront:

I have to inform Your Imperial Majesty, that there has been a minor setback on the Westfront. Von Mudra's Korps never reached Mühlhausen. It seems that his trains were intercepted when crossing through the region of Morhange; the II & III Bavarian Korps, the first on it's way to probe ahead and scout French intentions in Nancy and the latter stationary in Morhange, were also drawn into combat. In the Battle of the valley of the Mosel, we lost 18.000 men while the French Army und Castelnau lost only 11.000 men. Kronprinz Rupprecht's Army, as well as the I Bavarian and III Cavalry Korps, embarked towards Morhange as soon as fighting in the valley of the Mosel commenced, to try and close the gap before the French could exploit it. Rupprecht's VI Army suffered 26.000 casualties while Castelneau suffered 29.000. All forces involved have withdrawn to Metz.

The French seem to have a clear 2:1 superiority in artillery. Although I will not weaken the right wing any further, this can not stand. As of now, Castelnau is laying siege to Morhange. I expect it to surrender within the next two weeks. Although the front can be considered breached, I do not consider it a major threat. There is no railroad connecting the Nancy Front with Morhange. French reinforcements will have to cross the Mosel and march through it's valley. With muddy weather almost upon us, this will require additional time. And of course, any reinforcing force to Castelneau is a force that can not block the advance of our right wing towards Paris.

With von Mudra absent, Dubail's Army has crossed the lower Mosel and is laying siege to Mühlhausen. Von Below's Korps (XXI) will be railed to Freiburg, to block the crossing. It might not be a sufficient force, but we must make due with what we have. We will have to wait and see how the situation on the southern end of our line developes. Von Deimling's (XV) and XIV Korps are railed to Saarbourg and Strassbourg respectively. I've ordered the IV Cavalry and XIX Infantry Korps to cut the Railroads and proceed towards their designated positions. Reinforcing the Belgian and Ardenne Front should now detract a major chunk from the small French railroad pool. The VIII Infantry Korps will reinforce our forces in Luxemburg. This leaves Thionville weakened, but the Fortress can hold it's own in a siege. Luxemburg can not.

[ATTACH]33493[/ATTACH]



Belgian Front:

Your Imperial Majesty will rejoice at the recent dispatches from Kluck (I) and Bülow (II). Liege has been captured. Our heavy artillery wrecked several of the surrounding Forts, but the most daring operation was carried out by a single man. I'm sure Berlin is already ripe with chatter. Erich Ludendorff, formerly of my planning staff, took command of a leaderless force, positioned himself on high ground across the Citadel of Liege, drove up to the Castle, knocked on the gate and demanded surrender. And so they did. Would Your Majesty believe it? Oh, the daring. As I understand, Ludendorff is on his way to Berlin to receive the Pour le Merite from the hands of Your Imperial Majesty. He well earned it!

I have given orders, that Ludendorff is to join with von Hindenburg to replace Prittwitz in East Prussia. He has not followed orders thus far and I will not allow for this kind of insubordination. Ludendorff is to receive the rank of First Generalquartermaster. He will therefore be not a mere staff member of Hindenburg's, whom I know Your Imperial Majesty dislikes quite a bit, both will actually be on par in rank. I would have liked to find a different General, but there is no one else to be had Sire. Almost all men of the Junker families have taken up positions in the Army. Hindenburg had to be called out of retirement.

I will also order the Armies to surpress any Partisan activity instantly. Many of the older officers remember the damage Franc-tireur's did to the Army in the last war against France. This will not repeat itself. We will make sure that any civilian resistance against Your Imperial Majestys forces is punished immediately. We will also take charge of railroads and depots in Belgium, to make sure that supply and reinforcements reach Kluck's Spearhead by rail and in sufficient numbers. Why should an Army march on it's stomach when it can ride the railroad.

As far as movements of the Korps go, Your Majesty, I have ordered Lille, Arras, Artois and Douai to be occupied. Richthofen's Korps (II) has cut the Railroad at Guise and is now proceeding to Saint Quentin. Kluck himself is driving the I Army like the devil himself. I hear of men sleeping on the march and entire Korps singing to stay awake. The men have to endure incredible hardship and still fight the day after. Yet, the comfort of the individual has to be subjugated to the greater good. Victory. Von Hausen (III) has assembled his Korps and prepares a strike against Lanrezac's Army at Sedan. Although we cut the railroad at Montmedy, L'angle de Cary's Army at Longwy might well be in reach to reinforce Lanrezac.

I have therefore ordered, against my instincts, Albrecht von Württemberg (IV) to attack L'angle de Cary in Longwy. If he can delay a possible move to reinforce Lanrezac, I'm quite sure that we can drive the French out of Sedan. This will not only hand us a vital Railway hub connecting French territory with our new base in Brüssel, but it will also block the French from reinforcing the Fortress of Maubeuge. Bülow (II) will assault Namur; King Albert's small Army has been spotted in the region. We do not know if he has reinforced the Garrison, so we will hold off on an all-out-assault on Namur. The casualties might be too high if Albert adds his Army to the defenders.

[ATTACH]33494[/ATTACH]



East Prussian Front:

The East Prussian Front remains rather quiet. The Junker farmsteads and the Prussian hearthland are safe for now. Hindenburg has taken command of VIII Army and will immediately move against the Russian force in Wladislavov. Francois' Korps (I) has reported no Russian activity on the other banks of the Niemen and will therefore move to Gumbinnen. Maybe his Korps will be on time to reinforce Hindenburg's assault. Von Mackensen's Korps (XVII), always the bold Totenkopfhusar, will ignore any fighting in Wladislavov and flank Rennenkampf through the thick woods of Suwlaki. If Hindenburg can force Rennenkampf to retreat in disorder and, simultaneously, the Russians fail to reinforce Kowno, Mackensen might be able to get his Korps into Rennenkampf's rear to cut off his retreat.

It is dangerous as Mackensen himself might be cut off, because there is no time to build up sufficient military control in Suwlaki. Farther south, Scholtz's Korps (XX) and Below's Korps (I Reserve) will move forward to threaten the flanks of the Russian force under Samsonov. They will hold off for now. There are no news from Silesia except that a new Russian Korps has been formed in Lodz. We must not become too agressive, as we do not have the force to conduct greater offensives in this theater. We must look to the Austrians for support.

[ATTACH]33495[/ATTACH]



Galician Front:

Conrad has, very prudently I might add, decided to delay his planned offensive against the Russian Fortresses of Dubno, Rowno and Lutzk. There are Korps still out of positions. I think Your Imperial Majesty will agree, that an offensive has to be conducted out of a properly organized position. Brudermann's Army (V) has been ordered to Busk and Roth's Korps (XI) to Rawa Ruska. Along with the Erzherzog's (XIV) Korps still in place in Zloczow, Austrian forces will occupy a temporary defensive line partially shielded by confluents of the rivers Lipa to the south and Buh to it's north. The right flank does seem to be vulnerable, but this shall be adressed by an additional Korps deployed on it's right. Czernowitz seems impregnable for now. To the west, von Krasnik's Army (VI) moves out of Krakow to Tarnow. Count Kirchbach's Korps (I) will garrison Krakau. The Korps of Brlog will occupy Rozwadov and Hugo Meixner's Korps (V) will complete the line with the occupation of Jaroslaw. Von Krasnik's force will therefore be firmly entrenched behind the Wisla and San rivers. There is a gap at Przesmyl but it will be closed by additional forces already on the march. The position does seem to be favorable. There is no report of Russian forces except what seems to be a Russian Army across Czernowitz.

[ATTACH]33496[/ATTACH]



Serbian Front:

According to the reports Conrad received yesterday, apparently business caught him off-guard during a visit at the Opera, tensions are rising on the Austro-Serbian border. I have been busy, Your Imperial Majesty, urging Conrad to deploy his forces cautiously. The Serbs might be Slavs, but so are half of the Austro-Hungarian Army. We must not place too great a trust in them until they have had chance to prove their worth on the field of battle. Von Appel's Korps (XV) is withdrawn to Doboj behind the Sava and von Wurm's Korps (XVI) to Bosnia. Both Korps are of Potiorek's Army, who is still en route to Vienna to recieve his commission. I am told that his carriage was hindered by traffic caused by Croatian Grenzer Divisions who commandeered the narrow Hinterland roads the good General had to rely on. Kummer's Korps has arrived in Sarajevo but there are reports of a Montenegrian force to his south. Conrad has failed to include a map indicating it's position; he was probably occupied by the Opera "Duchess of Gerolstein" or his mistress. Or both. We do not know, and, I would venture to claim, Your Imperial Majesty, we don't want to know either.

Ritter Von Frank has received commission of his Army, over dinner, from Conrad and is on his way back to rejoin his troops at the border. To the far north, orders for the Army of von Böhm-Ermoli have not been revealed to me. XII Korps will join von Gieslingen at Peterwardein. Reports indicate a strong Serbian force assembling in Belgrade under Putnik. Von Gieslingen, in command until von Frank arrives, might not hold, but he must at least try. Some Riverboats seemed to have anchored close to his encampments. To the East, VII Korps has almost reached the Iron Gates. Great news, Your Imperial Majesty!

[ATTACH]33497[/ATTACH]



This concludes my report of Late August. You shall receive the next one in Early September.


Falkenhayn, fresh horses!!


Your Imperial and Royal Majestys most obedient Servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg
Westfront.jpg

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ashandresash
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Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:46 pm

I'll be following. Keep up the good work ;)

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Field Marshal Hotzendorf
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Sun Apr 26, 2015 10:39 pm

Excellent AAR so far! Good luck.

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Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:54 am

Generalstabshauptquartier
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Saarbourg, Early September 1914



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


Sire, news from the various theaters have been rather ambiguous. Some dispatches spoke of great victories, some of blunder and disaster. It pains me to inform Your Imperial Majesty, that we have been dealt a major blow in East Prussia.

A week ago, former Ambassador to Russia, Pourtalès, arrived in Mainz. While preparing for his return to Germany, he managed to collect information on the Russian economy and military. It appears that Russian industry is incapable of satisfying the need for shell and other munitions. The captains of industry seem to overcharge the state and deliver late, if they deliver at all. Large orders have been placed in France, Britain and the USA. He also told me that there exist two factions within the Russian Generalstab; while one advocated a full out assault against East Prussia, the other insisted on a campaign against Galicia. As it turns out now, both got their way. The Russians have a somewhat significant presence in Prussia, but the assault on Galicia seems to have been given priority. I believe that greater Russian losses and German success could well deepen those fractions within the Russian leadership.


Westfront:

Sire, I bring you news of a major victory in this theater. Your Imperial Majesty will rejoice to hear that Duke Albrecht defeated a French Army under L'angle de Cary in Longwy. Both forces were of equal strength; our Army took 11.000 casualties while 18.000 of the French Poilu remained on the field of battle. We are, as of now in posession of Longwy. The position can be described as comfortable. The VI Korps has been dispatched to reinforce the Württembergians at Longwy. This position shields our force at Sedan and might be used to apply pressure to the French flank if they push deeper into Alsace and Lorraine. Duke Albrecht has been ordered to prepare for a French counterattack.

Morhange surrendered yesterday. This was to be expected. Two Landwehr Divisions were taken prisoner in the process. It seems that Castelneau's force in Morhange has been reinforced. The French might soon endeavor to widen the gap or send spare Korps into the rear of our line. Preperations have been made Sire. Although it might be prudent to lure French forces deeper into the Gaps at Morhange and Mühlhausen, we must not let them overwhelm our positions. I have therefore ordered Kronprinz Rupprecht (IV) to move to the valley of the Mosel, to position himself behind Castelneau's Army. Your Son, Kronprinz Wilhelm (V), will attack Castelneau at Morhange while von Gebsattel's Korps (XV) will hold the position at Metz.

Von Heeringen has been wounded in battle at Colmar where French forces attacked our withdrawing troops; he is recovering in Freiburg. I have therefore decided to move the two Korps (XIV & III Bavarian) of his army to Saarbourg to merge them with Below's Korps. I am preparing to travel to Saarbourg myself to take command of the new army. I shall then immediately assist Kronprinz Wilhelm in his assault on Morhange. I hope that Kronprinz Rupprecht of Bavaria will come marching to the sound of the guns once in position. If his force is blocked prematurely we must trust on God to deliver victory to the German arms.

The IV Cavalry has, as ordered, cut the railroad at Briey and is now on it's way back to German positions.


[ATTACH]33510[/ATTACH]


Belgian Front:

It appears that the British landed a small Force in one of the channel ports over the last week. The three Korps that were designated to occupy Lille have been met by strong defensive fire. The British force is about 100.000 men strong and dug in. General von Einem (VII) lost 27.000 of his 52.000 men, inflicting 22.000 casualties on the British.

The Army of Kluck (I) has gone around Lille and was not drawn into the fight. Kluck has occupied Beauvais and is watering his horses in the lower Seine across the Forts of Paris. The French Capital is so close and yet so far. Without sufficient supplies and the reinforcements halted at Lille, Kluck can not continue his march around Paris. The weather is already shifting, the Rivers around the French capital may turn into impassable streams any day. This increases the danger of isolation of the I Army. We must not risk it, no matter the reward. With the stout Forts around Paris, storming the city is out of the question. We must therefore bring the II and III Armies up as fast as possible. Bülow (II), who will be assaulting Namur after an intensive bombardment and forcing King Albert's Army into the fortifications (both sides took ~20.000 casualties), will have some more hard fighting to do.

Von Hausen's III Army has clashed with an Army under Lanrezac and inflicted 25.000 casualties while only taking 13.000 himself. There are reports, that von Hausen, during the Battle at Sedan, sent two of his Korps through a marsh in the center of the line thought impassable and therefore unoccupied by the French. This brought him a glorious victory which must be exploited.

We must also cut off the British force in Lille. We have sufficient numbers in the vicinity to surround and destroy that contemptable little Army. It will delay the advance on Paris further, but we can not have 100.000 British and the channel ports in our rear. Linsingen's Korps (II) has been ordered, together with Lochow's Korps (III) to block the escape route at Arras. Von Einem's Korps (VII) must escape desaster in Lille. He and von Marwitz (II Cavalry) as well as von Emmich's Korps (X) will head for Tournai to escape. The Railroad in Guise will be repaired and I have ordered to prepare a Siege train for Maubeuge. Von Richthofen's Cavalry is continuing it's advance on the Depot and Railway of Saint Quentin. I believe victory to be possible, Your Imperial Majesty.


[ATTACH]33501[/ATTACH]


East Prussian Front:

Your Imperial Majesty, it grieves me deeply to inform you, that our efforts have met desaster in East Prussia. Mackensen's Korps (XVII) had been blocked on the advance to Suwlaki, retreated and joined Hindenburg at Wladislavov shorty before the attack on Rennenkampf. We inflicted 27.000 casualties on the Russians, while suffering 20.000 ourselves. In light that we are inferior in numbers in that theater, casualties are unacceptable.

After Hindenburg and Mackensen were beaten, Francois's Korps (I) arrived. He had not heard of the defeat, ignored Hindenburg's order to halt and rushed into battle on his own. The two divisions of his Korps were annihilated entirely. This is a monstrous blow to our efforts. We must hope that Francois can escape with his Artillery and Supply train. I have considered to court martial Francois for insubordination. Unfortunately, we're not only short on soldiers in the East, but on Generals also so we might have to rely on him a while longer.

With Samsonov's force moving forward, the Railroad into Königsberg is threatened. We must not let the Russians interrupt the flow of reinforcements. Scholtz Korps (XX) and Below's Korps (I Reserve) are ordered to Braunsberg and Elbing respectively to guard the rails. This will leave the fortress of Thorn threatened but I do not think the Russians capable of assaulting it.


[ATTACH]33502[/ATTACH]


Galician Front:

Conrad has informed me, that a magnificent Russian force, if the term "magnificent" can be applied to the rabble, descended from the forts of Dubno and Rowno. Conrad has decided to adjust the line accordingly. Brudermann's V Army will withdraw to Lemberg, Ferdinand of Austria's Korps (XIV) to Brzenany behind the Lipa. Additional reinforcements have been dispatched from Hungary. They were originally intended for Serbia, but now that the strength of the Russians is revealing itself, Conrad has ordered the prudent thing. Komarow is reinforced at Czernowitz. He is opposed by a growing Russian Force under Brusilov; a capable General from what Pourtalès has told me. In the West around Krakow, Meixner (V Korps) is ordered to Rozwadov to reinforce Brlog's Korps. The gap at Przesmyl will be closed.


[ATTACH]33503[/ATTACH]


Serbian Front:

Ritter von Frank has arrived from Vienna. He will take charge of forces in Peterwardein opposing Belgrade. The Iron Gates are almost under Austro-Hungarian military Control which will allow reinforces to be railed in. As of now, the front is rather quiet due to reinforcements being sent to Galicia. Any Offensive in Serbia will have to wait until Spring 1915. The Serbian mountains are too inhospitable, supply too expensive to get through.


[ATTACH]33504[/ATTACH]


This concludes my report of Early September. Your Imperial Majesty will receive the next on in Late September.



Your Imperial and Royal Majestys most obedient Servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Westfront.jpg
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg

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Byrd
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Tue Apr 28, 2015 2:30 pm

Oberste Heeresleitung
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Saarbourg, Late September 1914



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


"Und donnernd dröhnt die Artill'rie. Wir stehen vor der Infanterie. Granaten schlagen bei uns ein, Der Franzmann will in unsere Stellung 'rein."

Your Imperial Majesty will surely recognize this verse from the Argonnerwaldlied; be so kind, Your Majesty, and recall it's melody, it's elevated rythm ripe with the promise of glory, honor and victory, for several dispatches have reached me bearing word of the victory of German arms.


Westfront:

In Morhange, Kronprinz Wilhelm's magnificent Army, 110.000 men strong, clashed with an Army under Castelnau and Foch numbering 135.000 Poilu. I myself took on command of von Heeringen's Army, but could not prepare it in time to join the Battle. Then, 140.000 Bavarians joined the fight instead, just in time to turn the tide and transform certain disaster into glorious victory. The reports speak of 21.000 German soldiers dead on the field of battle and 31.000 French casualties. Castelnau and Foch must then have withdrawn to the valley of the Mosel; the French extracted themselves in orderly fashion and with great skill. The Kronprinz of Bavaria must have whipped his army like a farmer would a stubborn mule, because the lead elements of his Army, which had done battle just hours ago, reached the valley before the French. Joined by von Mudra's Württembergians, thirsting for revenge since the shameful defeat handed to them by Castelnau the month before, Rupprecht managed to block a French force on it's way to reinforce Castelnau in Morhange. The south Germans lost 13.000 men, while Xavier Ruffey's Army had to mourn 30.000 Poilu.

Rupprecht's victorious force will now make haste for Morhange, to rest for a few days. Von Gebsattel (XV) reports that both French Armies withdrew to Saint Mihiel, opposing Metz; a beaten, but still formidable force. It is to be expected, that the French armies will, after a few days of rest and reinforcements, be up to fighting strength. Metz must be considered as a possible target for a French counterstrike. Kronprinz Wilhelm von Preussen, Your Imperial Majesty's most able and honorable Son, will lead his Army back to Metz.

To the South, the French under Dubail have occupied Colmar. I myself am opposing him with an Army in Saarbourg. As of now, Strassbourg, bordering both Colmar and Saarbourg, stands undefended. Your Imperial Majesty, I have to make a grave decision; do I devide my Army in the face of the enemy, in order to defend both Fortresses or do I heed the advice of Frederick the Great and remind myself that he who defends everthing, defends nothing?! As of this moment, I believe that both Fortresses must be defended, albeit with insufficient force, to deny the enemy access to our Hinterland. He may try to cross at Freiburg, but I am confident that forces could be railed to Freiburg to destroy an eventual bridgehead rather quickly.

[ATTACH]33511[/ATTACH]



Belgian Front:

Your Imperial Majesty, great Battles have been fought in Belgium and northern France. Several Korps have been mustered in Brüssel and are now en route to reinforce the Kessel at Lille. The Korps of von Lochow (III) and von Linsingen (II) were ordered to Arras, to close the last route of escape out of Lille. Both Korps dug in quickly. During the night of the following day, the BEF's remaining 100.000 men attempted a breakout and ran head-on into the German field fortifications. Von Lochow reports 2400 of our men dead and 14.000 casualties inflicted on the British. Still, our relatively small force could not hold the British who were still in good enough shape to commence the retreat towards Amiens.

In the meantime, Kluck's I Army had advanced to Beauvais, with Paris already in sight of his men. There are reports that the troops, to endure the heavy burdens Kluck's merciless advance faced them with, have resorted to heavy consumption of spirits. As I understand it, Kluck was furious at the lack of discipline but his staff urged him to hold off on punishing the army; extraordinary hardships require extraordinary methods the officers said. And Kluck agreed. At Beauvais, men were seen dancing around roadsigns announcing the distance to the french capital. But then, suddenly, the advance had to be halted. Reports from Lille had arrived. The Korps that ran into the British Expeditionary Force in Lille had successfully surrounded the stubborn English who were now trying to break out. Kluck decided to turn his Army around towards Amiens.

The BEF, with a fighting strength of 83.000, clashed with von Kluck's I Army, 115.000 strong at Amiens. The exhausted British, pursued by the two German Korps of von Lochow, were no match for our brave soldiers. Although German arms suffered higher casualties, 18.000 against 11.000 British, the BEF had to halt their retreat and withdraw back to Lille. I am very confident, with all railroads either cut or occupied, that the BEF is doomed. Help from the coast may still come, this we can not rule out, but we must hope that we hold sufficient numbers to make the Islanders surrender. I ordered Lochow, for his extraordinary performance, promoted on the field of battle.

Von Hausen along with 140.000 soldiers of the III Army and associated Korps have pursued Lanrezac's 100.000 Poilu across the Meuse at Rethel. Casualties were almost en par; 29.000 German and 28.000 French lie dead on the banks of the Meuse. Still, we must be content, Your Imperial Majesty. Von Hausen, with Lanrezac continuing his involuntary withdrawal, claims victory and he has the ground to show for. The French Army has retreated to Reims. I do believe that they are still in good shape, but we must continue the Offensive at all costs. French Reinforcements from the Mosel Front might well be dispatched, so we must try to occupy their Armies as thorougly as possible. In the meantime, von Richthofen's Cavalry solidified it's hold on the Depot and Railroad hub at Saint Quentin.

To von Hausen's north, in Namur, after an intense bombardment by our superior siege artillery, King Albert's force surrendered to von Bülow (II). Supply lines across Belgium have been established with only the Fortress of Maubeuge as a last obstacle. I have ordered von Bülow to lay siege to the last significant Fortification between Brüssel and Paris. With German Armies at Longwy, Rethel and Saint Quentin and the Railroad cut at Beauvais, I consider it almost impossible for the French to send reinforcements to the west, or at least farther than Paris. Fall and it's brother, mud are almost upon us.

[ATTACH]33512[/ATTACH]



East Prussian Front:

The situation in Prussia, Your Imperial Majesty, unfortunately isn't equally as comfortable for German Arms. Hindenburg has dispatched the remains of von Francois (I) Korps to Königsberg. Both division are in dire need of replacements and rest, neither to be had at the front in Wladislavov. Francois has also been given a fresh command; although I do disagree with this on principle, the general situation does not allow court martial of one of Hindenburg's Lieutenant's. I have ordered Hindenburg to keep Francois close.

To the west, the rail-corridor into Königsberg has been secured by von Scholtz (XX) and Below (I Reserve). Another Korps, the XXIII Reserve under von Kathen, has arrived in Thorn. All three Korps have been sent reinforcements from Königsberg and will move against Samsonov's lead elements. Although we are still on the defensive, we must not let the Russian's too deep into Prussia. We have received reports of several Junker farmsteads set aflame, women raped and children nailed to barndoors. We must not allow the Prussian countryside be put to the torch.

[ATTACH]33513[/ATTACH]



Galician Front:

Mackensen's Korps (XVII), with two additional divisions, is en route to Lemberg to support Austrian operations and re-establish the front between the Buh and Lipa rivers. I had not expected the Austrians to be beaten that badly but it seems that the Russians have the upper hand on Conrad. Lemberg must not fall; this would drive a wedge into the Austro-Hungarian front, making von Komarow's position in Czernowitz almost untenable and threaten von Krasnik's flank in Krakau. Von Böhm-Ermoli's III Army has arrived at Kolomea, reinforcing von Komarow's position at Czernowitz. Brussilov's force seems to be growing steadily. He will have to cross the Pruth river to strike at Czernowitz; Conrad and I are in agreement that this is a rather strong position and can only be beaten by blundering on the Austrian end. With the III Army arriving, II Korps will be railed to Halicz, replacing von Denta's IV Korps which had been battered in the last battle at Lemberg. Brudermann (IV) will withdraw to Przesmyl and rest. Mackensen, once in Galicia, will take his position opposing Ruszki at Lemberg, or Lvov as the Slavs call it. In the meantime, XI and XIV Korps, both severly beaten in the battle of Lemberg, will withdraw behind the Lipa. I don't think the Russians capable to assault Lemberg and I have convinced Conrad to not interrupt the siege. We must consolidate and regroup before striking at Lemberg. The front around Krakau seems to be intact for now.

[ATTACH]33514[/ATTACH]



Serbian Front:

Contrary to Conrad's original strategy, this front is by far the most quiet. The Austrians are still working on establishing some sort of Military Control at the Iron Gates, Ritter von Frank (II) and Potiorek (I) do not have the manpower to overwhelm Putnik at Belgrade. The mountains of western Serbia can not be penetrated during Fall or Winter, so we must hold off until additional forces can be mobilized. Overall, Austrian mobilization has been a disaster. I have dispatched several officers to Conrad to assist with further planning of conscription and railroad tables. We must hope for the best.

[ATTACH]33515[/ATTACH]



This concludes my report of Late September. Your Imperial Majesty will receive the next report in early October


Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg
Westfront.jpg

Swagteamfivethousand
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Tue Apr 28, 2015 10:46 pm

Just a minor historical innacuracy, Fokker lived in Germany during WW1 and went to the Netherlands in 1919

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Byrd
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Wed Apr 29, 2015 12:18 am

Thank you :)

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Byrd
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Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:20 am

Oberste Heeresleitung
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Saarbourg, Early October 1914


Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


I must thank Your Majesty for intervening with Tirpitz on my behalf. It appears, that Your Majesty's younger brother Prince Heinrich of Preussen, has embarked for the Baltic Sea to intercept a Russian fleet wreaking havoc on our Baltic trade. Latest reports indicate that he is well and has beaten the Russians deceisively at sea. He seems to be on his way back to Königsberg. I will make sure that his fleet is properly celebrated at arrival, befitting a Prince of the Realm. If your Majesty would allow me to be so bold; the seafarer's blood in Heinrich is certainly showing.

If Your Majesty would be so kind as to turn your eyes to the maps and reports I've sent you for the first half of October. A storm of Blood and Iron is developing on the Westfront.


Westfront:

Your Majesty, events in Belgium are forcing my hand. The original plan, to remain on the defensive in Alsace and Lorraine has been thwarted by reality. I have therefore decided to move von Gallwitz (IX) and my own Army (VII), formerly commanded by von Heeringen, to Saint Mihiel, to attack the center of the enemy line. Kronprinz Rupprecht of Bavaria (VI) is currently at Morhange. He will join the attack as swiftly as possible. The II Bavarian Korps will be detached from Kronprinz Rupprechts Army and move to replace von Galltwitz. A second Korps, the IV Reserve Korps will move from Metz to Saarbourg. Our southern flank is going to be defended by only two Korps numbering 30.000 men. If attacked, they will not stand. Fortunately, it would take the French some time to take the magnificent Forts at Saar- and Strassbourg.

Duke Albrecht will attack L'angle de Cary at Briey. Your son, Kronprinz Wilhelm von Preussen, and his Army have been ordered to cross the Mosel and march to the sound of the guns if practicable. I expect the French to move at least one more Army to Belgium. Castelnau seems to be in the most promising position to reinforce their attack on Kluck.

The Rhein crossing at Freiburg is still being defended by a only small division of Militia. Dubail's Army is still at Colmar and reports from spies amongst the citizens of Mühlhausen indicate that no French reinforcements have crossed the Mosel so far. As long as Joffre does not reinforce Dubail, he will not be able to exploit the breakthrough without danger of being cut off by a swift strike.

[ATTACH]33522[/ATTACH]



Belgian Front:

Kluck (I) has taken Amiens in a direct assault; 10.000 of his soldiers are dead, so are 24.000 French. They have been asked, by von Kluck's second in Command, to surrender. But they would not. Their corpses now line the hastily errected fortifications. I thought that Kluck's move back to Amiens would complete the full envelopement, but I was a fool to believe that the British were beaten. Marie-César Pau's relieve force arrived just in time. Von Richthofen's Cavalry Korps was brushed aside at Saint Quentin before his men had finished destroying the rails. Pau stormed across the Somme and threw himself upon the force of General von Quast (IX Korps) at Douai. Von Quast 40.000 heroes suffered 5.000 casualties and inflicted 20.000 on the French, trying to cross the Somme in force.

Von Kluck must have heard the roar of the guns on the Somme. Marching east to the sound of the guns. He arrived at Douai and immediately went on the attack to drive Pau back across the Somme. But the French had dug in. At the center of Pau's line stood two colonial divisions from Africa. They fought like the demons they are. Kluck has attached reports from soldiers surviving the attack; they swear that they saw black men tearing the limbs from their Kameraden. I doubt that there is anything truthful about those stories Your Majesty and we should not resort to measures punishing colonial prisoners to satisfy the bloodlust of the common soldier. Even colonial soldiers are protected by the rules of War and should be treated accordingly. I am sure that Your Majesty would agree with this assessment. Von Kluck lost a staggering 42.000 men while Pau lost 44.000. Both Armies, at the outset of the Battle, numbered 160.000. We must find a way to minimize casualties. Recent maneuvers have been far too reactionary and have cost more German lives then they should have. Von Hausen (III) will be joined by von Bülow (II) and advance on Lanrezac at Reims. I expect nothing but victory.

I have dispatched reinforcements from Brüssel to renew our efforts to punish the British in Lille. I expect another British Corps or two to come south from the Channel ports. Right now, there is nothing
we can do to stop them from crossing the Channel.

[ATTACH]33521[/ATTACH]



East Prussian Front:

Matters in the East are much simpler. Hindenburg (Oberkommando Ost) has been sent reinforcements from Königsberg. I have tried to drag von Francois in front of a court martial once again. To defy his commander like he did at Wladislavov and to have your command annihilated in a frontal assault on an enemy outnumbering him three to one can not go unpunished. Luddendorf intervened on Francois' behalf and I shall rest my efforts to exact justice. For now. Hindenburg will strike at Rennenkampf at Wladislavov one more time. Francois' Korps (I) will move on the Russians who beat Mackensen at Suwlaki. We shall see if Francois will restore his honor. Farther to the west, von Scholtz (XX Korps) and Below's Korps (I Reserve) have been reinforced also. Four divisions of East Prussians have arrived by train just on time to join the offensive against Samsonov. Von Kathen's XXIII Reserve will advance from Thorn and try to join the assault.

[ATTACH]33520[/ATTACH]



Galician Front:

Mackensen has arrived at Grodek and stabilized the Front. Governor Ruzski's Russian Army is still besieging Lemberg; it's walls stand intact and I don't think that the Russians will be able to keep the siege going. Winter is Coming Your Majesty. It is known. Mackensen will be reinforced by a newly strengthened Austrian Army under Brudermann (V) and the XIV Austrian Korps commanded by von Denta. Both forces had been sent across the Karpathians to recover after they had been so thoroughly whipped by the Slavs. Another Russian Army, under Plehve, has descended from their northern fortifications. The most recent reports suggest they are camping at Rawa Ruska. I believe that Conrad is itching to strike at them, but I have urged caution once again. I even had to threaten to withdraw Mackensen's Korps back to Prussia. We must be firm in our dealings with the Austrians, especially with Conrad. He thinks himself a Lee or Napoleon and the most recent Austrian defeats at Lemberg are a direct result of this arrogance. I shall keep him on a short leash.

[ATTACH]33523[/ATTACH]



Serbian Front:

With mud upon us, Conrad has ordered Potiorek (I) to assault the Depot at Zvornik. His hope is that Potiorek's three Korps can force the Serbians to retreat and to strike again when mud and the swollen Sava river slow down their retreat. The Serbs are formidable fighters and probably dug in at the Depot. But Potiorek outnumbers them 2:1; odds that should allow even him a chance at victory. Meanwhile, Ritter von Frank (II) has been railed to the Iron Gates to threaten the Serbian lines of supply. Peterwardein and our base of operations are undefended, but even if the Serbians take it, I wouldn't think them capable to exploit it.

[ATTACH]33524[/ATTACH]



You shall receive the next report in Late October Your Majesty



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
Westfront.jpg
Belgium.jpg
East Prussia.jpg

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Sir Garnet
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Fri May 01, 2015 1:45 am

Jolly good narrative and images, but I'm having trouble reading the power numbers on the various forces when the identifying circles clip them.

It does seem that Lemberg is usually doomed to be besieged, if not overrun, and that Czernowitz is the key and right anchor to the Carpathian position so well worth Brusilov's attention - but may be more easily turned if Lemberg falls and the Russians can roll up the rail line through Stanislaus. Just not in the winter - very painful time.

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Byrd
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Fri May 01, 2015 8:48 am

Edited

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Byrd
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Mon May 04, 2015 12:12 am

Oberste Heeresleitung
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Saint Mihiel, Late October 1914


Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


The Army has fought two major battles at Saint Mihiel. Having taken up command myself, I am writing my report from the field tent of the VII Army Sire.

I have been sent a report from Admiral Tirpitz Your Majesty. It seems that we have lost contact with the U-boot fleet in the North Sea commanded by von Pohl. The last reports indicate, that the U-boats, on their way to Wilhelmshaven, were set upon by a British fleet. We must expect the worst. Time is short Your Majesty, preparations for further fighting have to be made. I will therefore keep the personal note a little shorter than usual.



Westfront:

Close to 375.000 German soldiers crossed the Mosel during the night of the sixteenth of October, on numerous pontoon bridges I had ordered made by our Pioneers in the days prior to the assault. The VII. Army, commanded by myself, crossed the river first. We made the crossing without an incident and managed to establish a bridge-head. I ordered the lead elements to dig in as fast as possible. French recon planes had been circling above our heads for some hours; I therefore expected a full-out French counterattack to drive us into the Mosel. The attack came at dawn and was preceeded by an artillery barrage that lasted 4 hours. Casualties, were acceptable considering the circumstances.

The French Poilu came and threw themselves against our field fortifications hour after hour.

Around noon, several enemy regiments made it to our line, using downed trees and shell craters as cover. The sound of tens of thousands of rifles suddenly stopped, as if a great blanket of silence had been laid upon the field, covering all noise. Vicious roaring hailed the first seconds of what would turn out to be an hour of hand to hand fighting. When day's end drew near, the French retreated; 61.000 German soldiers dead, 73.000 French casualties. After a few hours of sleep and after all Regiments and Brigades had crossed, we thought that it was time to test the French defenses, alas unsuccesfully. Again, 60.000 dead, 70.000 French casualties. But the French remained in posession of the field. Our Armies were battered too badly. The decision was made to withdraw behind the Mosel.

In Briey, the Army of Duke Albrecht (IV) clashed with the Army of L'angle de Cary, hero of no one and conquerer of nothing! Albrecht was joined by the Army of Kronprinz Rupprecht and Kronprinz Wilhelm. Approximately 365.000 Germans assaulted 160.000 Frenchmen. Unfortunately, de Cary managed to execute a fine fighting withdrawal before our numbers could come to bear; 11.000 casualties on both sides, with Duke Albrecht in posession of Briey. His supplies are dwindling and it will be very hard to establish a route to get through to him sufficient food for man and horse. I will order him back to Longwy, as I expect the soon-to-be freed up French Armies to counterattack.

[ATTACH]33533[/ATTACH]



Belgium:

There has been very little action in Belgium Your Imperial Majesty. Von Linsingen's II Korps was nearly cut off by the British advance on Lille. He somehow managed to outrun the enemy forces to Mons. His Korps is resting at Von Kluck's encampment. Both will soon be joined by a newly raised Army, led by Generalleutnant von Böhn (X). Several Korps have been levied and sent to the Rally point in Brüssel. They will be assigned to the various parts of the frontas swiftly as possible.

[ATTACH]33534[/ATTACH]



East Prussia:

Francois, Your Majesty. He did it again, damn his eyes! During the second Battle of Wladislavov, Francois Korps (I) was ordered to attack a Russian Korps, of equal strength, at Suwlaki to clear the woods of Russians. His Korps moved, in marching column, into the woods blindly. Due to the density of the forest, Recon planes were of no use. Neither was cavalry. A screen of Skirmishers would have been the prudent thing to do. I am told that Francois wouldn't have it. Riding ahead of his men on his Hannoveranian steed, he only noted the Russian presence when they opened fire from both flanks. It wasn't a battle. It was a massacre! This is our Teutoburg Forest Your Majesty, and Francois our Varus. Two divisions have been annihilated in 30 minutes. Hindenburg had to send 3 Divisions to rescue the artillery and supply train and had his center crushed as a result. A black day for our efforts in the East, Sire. Scholtz' Korps (XX) has been ordered to Goldap, to strengthen Hindenburg's right flank. Von Kathen's Korps (XXIII Reserve) has force marched to Lötzen, to complete the line. I have ordered Francois arrested by a detachment of the Guard. His incompetence can no longer be tolerated. I have asked Generals von Hindenburg, von Scholtz and von Kathen to assemble a Kriegsgericht in Königsberg; Francois will be judged by his peers and punished accordingly.

[ATTACH]33535[/ATTACH]



Galicia:

Dispatches from Conrad speak of a battle at Czernowitz Your Majesty. It seems that Brusilov has crossed the river to strike at the anchor of the Austro-Hungarian right flank. Czernowitz was defended by two Austrian Armies; Böhm-Ermoli's III and von Komarow's IV, 140.000 Austro-Hungarian soldiers. Yet, Brusilov and his 110.000 men managed to beat them deceisively; 32.000 Austro-Hungarian and 45.000 Russian casualties. It appears that both, Böhm-Ermoli as well as Komarow had positioned their artillery so that they could shell Fort Chotin, the Russian fortification, and base of operations, on the opposite side of the Pruth. Since Brusilov kept his plans secret and neither Böhm-Ermoli nor Komarow expected a full-fledged Russian assualt, there was simply no time to reposition the heavy and medium guns to fire on the Russian Divisions crossing the river. The Austro-Hungarian trenches, Conrad writes, due to the ignorance of his Generals, had been neglected also. As a result, the Austrians withdrew their force. I expect them to regroup for a counterattack, but I do not have high hopes as far as its success. Böhm-Ermoli's III will be railed to the Depot at Stanislau to recover.

To the north, at Jawrow, von Limanowa and Mackensen taught the Russians a lesson in the might of German arms. Two Austro-German Korps, numbering 70.000 men, beat 105.000 Russians under Plehve. A mere 15.000 Austrians and Germans are listed as casualties while Russian Generals will have to replace 44.000 of their men. An impressive victory Your Majesty. It seems that Mackensen, still the Cavalryman at heart, unleashed two Divisions of horsemen on the shattered Korps of Plehve. On the flat terrain surrounding Lemberg, the Horse-soldiers wreaked havoc, causing a majority of Russian casualties. Both, von Limanowa's Korps (XI) and Mackensen (XVII) have to regroup at Przesmyl since Lemberg is still under siege.

[ATTACH]33536[/ATTACH]



Serbia:

Sire, I do not know where to begin. To say that Potiorek has been whipped thoroughly would fall short of what really happened. His Army was almost destroyed. Conrad himself is not sure what exactly happened; he assured me that he would examine the reports from Potiorek as soon as possible. Ordered to Zvornik, Potiorek (I) and two of his Korps, von Appel (XV) and von Wurm (XVI) had to traverse the wooded hills of east Bosnia to hit the Serbs occupying the former Austrian Depot on the border. A Serb Army, commanded by Stepanovic, 65.000 men strong had errected fortifications at the old depot. Potiorek, thinking the Serbs low and unworthy of an Austrian bullet, had his three Korps form in one deep attack column, to assault the entrenchments head on. He lost 95.000 out of 150.000 Your Majesty; two third of his entire force. In the End, von Appel and von Wurm took command out of Potioreks hands and managed to inflict some 20.000 casualties on the Serbs. As of right now, I don't know if Potiorek can extracate himself from the disaster he got himself in. We must await word from Conrad, who has assembled an Army and is currently on the train to Deta, to support von Franks (II) expedition into east Serbia.

[ATTACH]33537[/ATTACH]



You shall receive the next report in Early November Your Majesty



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg
Westfront.jpg

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FightingBuckeye
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Tue May 05, 2015 12:03 am

Byrd, I'm enjoying reading through your AAR thus far. I haven't played or even own this game. But I've been considering getting it at some point in the future. So I might get lost at times when you're talking about some of the regions or generals. But that's not on you and overall it's a pretty solid AAR. Just figured I'd let you know that your effort is definitely appreciated.

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Byrd
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Tue May 05, 2015 7:42 am

Thank you very much Sir.

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Shri
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Tue May 05, 2015 7:16 pm

hey Byrd, excellent AAR so far, a few questions; please answer if you are sure that your opponent cannot benefit.

1. Why did you pick Plan CONRAD? I find it disastrous.
2. You have decided to reinforce the Western Armies and not the Eastern Armies with your home reserves, are you sure of victory in the West or is your Western opponent weaker than the Eastern one?
3. Mackensen travelled in one turn from Koenigsberg to Lemberg, or did i get that wrong!? or did you REDEPLOY him? If so did you lose overall RAILWAY strength?
4. You have left the Flanks open between Sedan and Lilee and again between Sedan and Briey. Strange the French didn't exploit that and chose to fight attrition.
5. You have won several battles (3+) against the Brits with lesser casualties? any tricks? i find the Brits the strongest of all armies in 1914 due to their highly experienced corps.
Rascals, would you live forever? - Frederick the Great.

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Byrd
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Tue May 05, 2015 9:29 pm

Jolly good questions. Looks like my opponents are already beating me without additional advice, I think we're safe =)

1. Well, I don't like the NM and Alignment hits that go with the other plans. Conrad gives me enough to repel (If I position my forces right) a premature Russian assault and I have enough in Serbia to ripen them for later conquest. But it's mainly that I dislike the NM hits.

2. I'm not sure of victory any longer, but I'm fairly certain that it's still possible. As soon as that changes, so will my focus.

3. I redeployed him, yes. We don't have a houserule in place against it, although I feel like there should be one against beaming forces.

4. The way the situation developed kinda crossed my plans. I thought I could surround and destroy the BEF quickly, with Kluck ahead at Beauvais, but it didn't work. The gap gets closed in the next turns. Exploiting the gap with 2 German Armies in the vicinity probably didn't seem to be an option.

5. No tricks against the British. I won those battles when I had Kluck and his Corps surrounding the BEF in Lille. I had superiority and was lucky that I hit it when it crossed the river to escape to Amiens. I lost 2 battles in the most recent turns, so the equilibrium seems to have been restored ;)

Quite curious how our game will go =)

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Byrd
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Tue May 05, 2015 9:31 pm

Jolly good questions. Looks like my opponents are already beating me without additional advice, I think we're safe =)

1. Well, I don't like the NM and Alignment hits that go with the other plans. Conrad gives me enough to repel (If I position my forces right) a premature Russian assault and I have enough in Serbia to ripen them for later conquest. But it's mainly that I dislike the NM hits.

2. I'm not sure of victory any longer, but I'm fairly certain that it's still possible. As soon as that changes, so will my focus.

3. I redeployed him, yes. We don't have a houserule in place against it, although I feel like there should be one against beaming forces.

4. The way the situation developed kinda crossed my plans. I thought I could surround and destroy the BEF quickly, with Kluck ahead at Beauvais, but it didn't work. The gap gets closed in the next turns. Exploiting the gap with 2 German Armies in the vicinity probably didn't seem to be an option.

5. No tricks against the British. I won those battles when I had Kluck and his Corps surrounding the BEF in Lille. I had superiority and was lucky that I hit it when it crossed the river to escape to Amiens. I lost 2 battles in the most recent turns, so the equilibrium seems to have been restored ;)

Quite curious how our game will go =)

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Sir Garnet
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Fri May 08, 2015 10:13 pm

AH vs. Serbia: It is a strong temptation and historically almost a compulsion to crush the Serbs, but they are uncooperative and resilient unless they can be caught in a mistake. Looking at this from playing the Serbian side, venturing into Imperial territory bears grave risks of being overwhelmed unexpectedly while on the move, being cut off if taking a defensive position, and serious supply concerns. Belgrade can be lost easily if undermanned.

The most disconcertingly effective Austrian approach is a gradually constricting cordon of Serbia and cutting Belgrade's rail line south - whether from AI strategy or happenstance, it means loss of the central towns and defeat in detail in the center and south if the Central Powers bring in enough troops to lock in Belgrade.

To effectively counter the Austrians, I put considerable resources into replacements and fresh Serbian units, including mountain troops and artillery, but this does have the cost of reducing Russian potential, with the risk of a total loss if Serbia is overrun.

Can the Serbs evacuate by sea and fight on if there is a Western player who provides the fleet? Serbia can also be relieved by bringing Greece into the war, or a Salonika campaign, but trying a big push against Austria through the rough Balkan terrain is bound to be difficult and time-consuming.

Redeployment: Playing as the Russians, I have used rail but not redeployment. However, a little redeployment does make sense for units with expedited transport in cases where road and rail would be unrealistically slow, especially for generals.

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Byrd
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Fri May 08, 2015 11:10 pm

Won't disagree with you.

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Field Marshal Hotzendorf
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Fri May 08, 2015 11:55 pm

Well said Sir Garnet, well said.

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Byrd
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Sat May 09, 2015 11:44 pm

Oberste Heeresleitung
Generaloberst Von Moltke
Saint Mihiel, Early November 1914


Your Imperial and Royal Majesty


Dire news from the front Your Majesty. The Army has been dealt a blow in Reims on the Marne, gate to Paris. Furthermore, I've received news from the Secretary of the Navy Your Majesty. The Intelligence Bureau of the Navy intercepted a message adressed from First Admiral Fisher to the commander of the British Channel Fleet; four British Divisions were to be shipped across the Channel. Admiral Hipper laid out a plan to intercept the enemy transports out at sea. I urged Tirpitz to sanction the bold foray into enemy waters and he did, Your Majesty. The result of Hipper's expedition was rather curious. His fleet, 150 Battleships strong, sailed right into a pack of 43 British submarines. He reports that about 25 submarines suddenly emerged in between his own fleet. We sank a couple of them, of course but the enemy transports got away. Hipper returned to Wilhelmshafen yesterday and is refitting his ships for further glory.


Westfront:

I have merged von Gallwitz's battered XII Army and my own, Your Majesty. The French counterattack at Saint Mihiel left us too weak to continue our offensive. I had envisioned a more deceisive defeat of French Arms, but god was on the side of the Poilu that day. I have ordered the Army to prepare for a forced march to Morhange. We must cross the Mosel before daw or we risk the French lunging at our exposed rear. The night has so far been quiet. Kronprinz Wilhemls Army (V) will move to Morhange, Kronprinz Rupprechts Force (VI A), as is von Heeringens VII Army, already en route to Strassburg to oppose Dubail at Colmar. With the OHL retreating to Metz, Duke Albrecht (IV Army) to my north will have to withdraw to Longwy as fast as possible. Von Emmichs XII Korps is dispatched to Rethel, to reinforce the push towards Reims.

[ATTACH]33568[/ATTACH]



Belgian Front:

There has been a battle in Reims Your Majesty. General von Bülow, head of the II Army and one of Your Majesty's favorite battlefield Commanders, attacked a French force commanded by Lanrezac; both Armies fielded 175.000 men. The German forces lost nearly 50.000 men, the French 35.000 your Majesty. Unfortunately, a powerful victory of French Arms. I have ordered von Hausens III Army, which had been involved in Bülows attack on Reims, to the Depot at Sedan. The Army needs rest and reinforcements to recuperate. One officer performed most commendable at Reims Your Majesty; Ewald von Lochow. I have decided to promote him to Army command and have therefore recalled him to Metz. Furthermore, I have ordered General von Dellmensingens II Korps to move to Chalons on the Marne. I fear that French Armies will use the railroads to strike at our Armies in Reims with superior force. I hope that von Dellmensingen can entrench and block or delay possible French reinforcements.

[ATTACH]33569[/ATTACH]



East Prussian Front:

Sire, I fear that sending additional forces to Prussia is turning out to be a major mistake. I already had, before hostilities commenced in August, weakened the right wing considerably to make sure that our forces on the Mosel stand a chance of defending against a French onslaught. In the past months, I weakened it even more; reinforcements that could have helped surrounding the British or assisted in our push on Reims, were sent to reinforce Hindenburg instead. I have ordered those Korps returned to the western theater. If there ever was a chance to destroy the French in front of Paris, it is now; von Woyrsch (VI), von Below (IR), von Conta (VIII K), von Scholtz (XX) and von Kathen (III K) will be railed to Rethel to join von Bülow in the push on the French capital. I know what Your Majesty must think. First I send the reinforcements to Prussia, two weeks later, I have to recall them to Belgium. I am aware of mistake myself, I assure you. Hindenburg (VIII A) being defeated and Francois (I) being annihilated twice stoked my fear of a Russian advance deeper into Prussian territory. I hope that Your Majesty will forgive my mistake.

[ATTACH]33570[/ATTACH]



Galician Front:

Conrad has decided to counterattack the Russian Army under Brusilov at Czernowitz. The attacking forces will include Böhm-Ermoli's III, von Komarow's IV Army and Mackensen's XVII Korps, which will journey to Czernowitz by rail. We must hope that united Austrian and German arms can drive the Russians back across the river. If the Russians can cling on to Czernowitz, they can threaten the eastern railroad through the Karpatians.

[ATTACH]33571[/ATTACH]



Serbian Front:

Conrad reports that there are no significant news from the Serbian front Your Majesty except that he ordered Potiorek's (I) Army to recover from the most recent disaster at Banja Luka.

[ATTACH]33572[/ATTACH]



You shall receive the next report in Late November Your Majesty



Your Imperial and Royal Majesty's obedient servant
Generaloberst Helmuth Ludwig von Moltke
Attachments
Serbia.jpg
Galicia.jpg
East Prussia.jpg
Belgium.jpg
Westfront.jpg

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FightingBuckeye
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Tue Jun 02, 2015 8:24 pm

I hope you didn't mean late November of RL vs in game :-p

Looking forward to the next installment.

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Byrd
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Tue Jun 02, 2015 9:54 pm

Hah! No, I'll do the next one right after my exams are done (Early July). They have been quite a drag on my creative writing =)

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FightingBuckeye
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Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:19 pm

It's really hard to find the time to work on your AAR. Maybe I'm just taking too much time, but I might spend on average 30-60 minutes on the actual turn and then another 1-2.5 hours on my actual AAR depending on how involved the turn is, what kind of graphics I come up with, etc.

Good luck on your exams and I'll be tuning in come July.

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