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tripax
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tripax (USA) vs Straight Arrow (CSA): a Federal history

Wed Apr 13, 2016 4:33 pm

In April and early May 1865, treasonous madmen took control of the political machinery of the southern US, taking Fort Sumter, Norfolk and Harpers Ferry. Rumors [Straight Arrow's points to know] suggest that outposts in the Far West are at risk. In order to deal with the threat, forces began to gather in Washington, and a small force under General Keyes with Lew Wallace second in command consisting of the state forces in the Washington Brigade and the 1st New York Cavalry under Carl Shurz was sent by train from that city to secure Harpers Ferry. The force was joined on the trains near Annapolis with the only federal forces available, a regiment of Marines. Arriving in Hapers Ferry in early May, it did not attack immidiately. Wallace and Keyes were called to join Mansfield and Patterson in the mountains, and Milroy was sent from DC. In the meantime under Schurz in late May, the Union forces in Harpers Ferry attacked, easily sweeping aside a force of militia standing in the way.

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Early in the war, militia units were called up in New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois with a goal of securing Western forts. It was unclear early in the war what success these units would have. One regiment of Illinois Militia arrived in Jefferson City, Missouri in advance of any other federal forces, securing the capital. The treasonous ex-state government officials fled.

Great effort was made in those early days to recruit regiments from all states.
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Gray Fox
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Wed Apr 13, 2016 5:03 pm

I'm looking forward to this!
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tripax
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Thu Apr 14, 2016 2:56 pm

Gray Fox wrote:I'm looking forward to this!


Thanks. We'll see how it goes. I play a very regimented style in the early war, trying to recreate history with variations I find interesting and plausible. This game, my variation is that the Union is going to prioritize recapturing federal installments. So the Battle of Hatteras Inlet is coming soon, as is a (probable) loss at First Bull Run. Capturing forts is easy, while Harpers Ferry and Norfolk are hard, so I'm going to wait on Norfolk, but you've already seen a bit of the story at Harpers Ferry.

Along with recreating history, I put my try to shuffle my builds a bit, so it takes a turn or two extra to get troops to the front lines (and a turn more if I want to train conscripts, which I try to do). I also love support units. This leaves me vulnerable to an aggressive CSA in early turns, we'll see how it goes.

First Bull Run and Wilson's Creek are very hard to replicate. A fast CSA can get to Springfield in force before the Union can arrive (you have to split your forces in Fayetteville). So the Union is almost guaranteed to lose at Springfield and at Manassas. Two early losses like this are fine, but the new retreat rules are confusing to me. When I make these attacks in tests, I lose and end up sitting there. I can usually escape at Manassas, although I am very vulnerable to a strong counterstroke towards the capital. But Wilson's Creek is less developed and thus a slower (and hungrier) retreat. Thus, I only plan to replicate the former.

I'll try to write this as a "history", but let me know if anyone has questions or advice (which I'll probably misinterpret or ignore anyway).
Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Thu Apr 14, 2016 3:01 pm

In early June, 1861, General Patterson had gathered a large group of forces in the mountains of northern Virginia, what would later become the eastern part of West Virginia - and from here on in this narrative will be. These forces were given two important tasks. One, they should secure the rail lines through the northern part of the state. Two, they should attack Confederate forces in Clarksburg in conjunction with West Virginia state militia and defence forces in Wheeling led by Generals McCall and Hurlburt. In a fit of cowardice, Patterson asked his second in command, General Hamilton, to lead the attack on Floyd, with Generals Mansfield, Keyes, and Lew Wallace leading the 6th, 2nd, and 5th NVA brigades respectively. Patterson remained in the Eastern part of the state with light brigades securing the railways.
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Hurlburt arrived first, arriving from the West, but crossed the Fork River near Meadowbrook, north of the Confederates and approached Floyd's camp along Murphy Run, that is from the north-east. Light skirmishing occurred on the 8th day of June and the McCall retreated north-east.
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On the 14th, fighting broke out again, with Floyd having the upper hand and the lines under McCall were beginning to break, particularly the 3rd WV militia and the 11th WV cavalry. Hamilton finally arrived from the West and put his brigades in one at a time, with Mansfield in the front. Mansfield met the southern edge of Floyd's line with great effect, Floyd's first brigade fled. However, the Virginia Volunteer Cavalry swept across and captured in its entirety the 1st Wisconsin Infantry. Even so, Hamilton had about 8250 men to Floyd's 4800, and easily won the day, although losing forces roughly in proportion to those engaged, 1000 Union Casualties against 600 Confederate.
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Elsewhere, two Ohio light infantry brigades were sent by George McClellan to West Virginia. These forces arrived in Calhoun County, just west of Clarksburg, too late to join the battle. These were ordered towards Braxton, West Virginia with a goal of preventing Floyd's retreat towards Charlseton, WV and the West Virginia Philippi Races had begun.

[Note: SA is hosting, and I don't have and in pbem wouldn't use the BattleLog, so the battle report is based only on the in-game battle report]
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Gray Fox
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Thu Apr 14, 2016 5:10 pm

Interesting idea. I wonder if two players recreated the actual timeline of the Civil War as closely as possible with the game...who would win?
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tripax
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Thu Apr 14, 2016 8:29 pm

Gray Fox wrote:Interesting idea. I wonder if two players recreated the actual timeline of the Civil War as closely as possible with the game...who would win?


I tried playing against myself in that way, but kept getting the wrong results in battles and it was taking too long without being fun enough. This game has been extremely close. We've had our West Virginia campaign sweeping away the Confederates there. Next turn I capture Fort Clark in Hattaras Inlet about a month early, lose in Manassas about the right time, and win a central Missouri "Wilson's Creek" a half a month early (He attacked my force under Lyon in the region between Springfield and Jefferson City).

Ball's Bluff would be next, but I sent C. P. Stone with Butler to Hatteras. I'm not sure if I can capture Springfield Missouri by the end of October, and after that comes, I guess, Grant's campaign to Donelson, Pea Ridge, and Pope capture of Island 10. Pea Ridge is possible, but the other two are fairly mutually exclusive in this game and have to wait until Kentucky opens up anyway (so who knows). Beyond that, I don't intend to follow history at all, except I'd like a Spring 1862 aquatic invasion in the Gulf, either New Orleans, Mobile, Pensacola, or Galveston depending on if and how much I can spare from Virginia.
Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Fri Apr 15, 2016 10:43 am

The Philippi Races were exciting for all involved, but did not lead to a full battle. Floyd's 1st brigade was met on July 2 by the two light brigades from Ohio which had met with General Blenker. The skirmish cost about 100 casualties on both sides and Blenker moved his forces west to secure Charleston.

In June, General Joe Johnston consolidated his forces in Winchester for a move on Harpers Ferry. In order to limit the ability of this force to flank Union forces at Harpers Ferry to the West, Patterson directed a part of his force to secure the rail lines, gaining complete military control over the area. In early July, rail lines secured, Patterson's force consolidated under General Milroy in Harpers Ferry, totaling 19,700. Patterson himself moved West to follow up Floyd's forces retreating through West Virginia. On the 9th day of the month, about 13,600 men under General Joe Johnston arrived and battle ensued. In the first phase of battle, the Stonewall Brigade and Smith's Brigade took the lead, smashing themselves against a broad front of Pennsylvania reserves, a group of 4 light infantry brigades from Pennsylvania, as well as light brigades from Maryland, New Jersey, and light brigades from Patterson's Army of Norther Virginia. The 4th Pennsylvania and the 1st US Infantry Regiment played key roles in the first phase of the battle for the Union. In the second phase, the 4th Pennsylvania was nearly destroyed, but impressively showed no signs of cowardice.

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Another great victory for the Union came the next day at Hattaras Inlet and the Battle of Fort Clark, where 4,500 men under General Butler and C. P. Stone stormed the fort capturing the fort and coastal batteries - particularly due to the efforts of the 1st Maryland Brigade.

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Nathaniel Lyon became famous with his securing of central Missouri. Asboth having secured Jefferson City and loyal militia securing Rolla (where the confederates had burned the depot in a militia-led raid), Lyon began gathering forces in Camden County between Springfield and Jefferson City [incorrectly called Erie in the game, I don't know of any Erie Missouri between Springfield and Jefferson City]. Those forces were waiting the arrival of supply wagons as well as the establishment of depots, which were being built along the Missouri in Jefferson City and Leavenworth, Kansas as well as in Parkersburg, WV. Encamped with about 6,000 men, Lyon was personally accompanied by a brigade of Kansas Mounted Volunteers with General Morrell heading the 2nd Missouri Brigade and General Wood heading a brigade of Western Volunteers. General Shelby led a force of nearly 10,000 including his own accompaniment by a brigade of Missouri Cavalry, and Weightman's Brigade (now under General Thomas) and Bowen's Brigade (now under General Whiting). Morrell's Missouri Brigade performed especially well against an attack by Bowen's (Whiting's) Brigade and one regiment of confederate Missouri militia charged into Lyon's Cavalry but was entirely wiped out through casualty and desertion (no prisoners were captured on either side) when they met a regiment of regular infantry. This battle occurred on July 10.

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Under intense pressure in Virginia, General McDowell led his army across Bull Run Creek on July 13, but were defeated after a short battle against Beauregard. The fighting was relatively bloodless given the sizes of the armies involved, McDowell losing a little over 3,000 of his 30,700 men committed and Beauregard losing just under 2,000 of his 34,400 men involved. Longstreet's brigade (now under Holmes) performed very well for the Confederates, and all men in a regiment of US Cavalry was captured or killed in the engagement.

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Also of note, on that same July 13, a small skirmish took place in Tuscon, Arizona, where a regiment of cavalry routed a New Mexico confederate ranger unit, although there were few if any casualties.
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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

vicberg
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Fri Apr 15, 2016 2:43 pm

woops wrong thread!

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Jerzul
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Fri Apr 15, 2016 3:51 pm

vicberg wrote:woops wrong thread!


I was really confused for a moment!
I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain success can be dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.

-Abraham Lincoln, 1863, in a letter to Major General Joseph Hooker.

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Fri Apr 15, 2016 11:34 pm

Obviously, so was I

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Cardinal Ape
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Sat Apr 16, 2016 12:06 am

Nice maps.

I'm impressed with your pursuit of recreating history. I can never bring myself to order that Union death march on Manassas.

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Sat Apr 16, 2016 1:05 am

But what a glorious death march! Drums beating, banners flying...

arms shot off...y'know, the usual.
[color="#AFEEEE"]"Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!"[/color]
-Daniel Webster

[color="#FFA07A"]"C'mon, boys, we got the damn Yankees on the run!"[/color]
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tripax
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Sat Apr 16, 2016 8:11 am

Cardinal Ape wrote:Nice maps.

I'm impressed with your pursuit of recreating history. I can never bring myself to order that Union death march on Manassas.


Thanks. It is a new trick for me, but fun to do. I'm not a real life tactician, so let me know if I design a battle that looks totally implausible.

Honestly, I send the troops in on orange/blue, so they should retreat after less battle. Also, I keep Mansfield in West Virginia, he has a penalty on the retreat, so shouldn't be used if you want to retreat from battle right away. If you go in O/O, the first battle will be bloodier on both sides, but probably still in proportion. However, you'll lose a lot more cohesion and retreat will be very difficult under the new retreat rules. And when you do get to Alexandria, you are more open to a counter stroke as your force will be totally exhauted. As it is, the force is in Alexandria (militia kept up trenches which were waiting for me) having lost about 70% of my cohesion, but will still probably be able to hold off an attack if Beauregard follows me.
Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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Sat Apr 16, 2016 3:59 pm

On July 16 the rearguard forces under McDowell were forced to fight against Beauregard's Army in order to affect a retreat across Bull Run Creek and back to Alexandria. This battle was considered a success, both armies losing just under 4,000 men.

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The next day came the first significant Naval Battle and the first battle in Kentucky when two gunboat squadrons of two gunboats each patroling the Mississippi near Cairo under Admiral Foote found itself up river from a much larger force under Admiral Hollins. Three of the four Union boats were sunk, while Hollins barely suffered a hit. Foote retreated to the shipyards in Cairo, joined by three more gunboat squadrons which were patrolling elsewhere.

South of the river battle, General Polk led the TN Bde into Mississippi County Missouri, near the town of Charleston. Missouri and Illinois Union Militia had secured the area, and retreated after light skirmishing on July 22. In the same time period, the 1st Ohio Brigade, and an Illinois Volunteer Brigade (light) had been sent from their training under McClellan further East, and they arrived just days later, securing the landing in Missouri and allowing Union forces to remain in control of the area. About 250 Union men, all from the 3rd Missouri Militia, and 350 Confederates died in the skirmishing.

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Confederate forces had continued depredations against federal installments, not stopping at Sumter, Norfolk, or even Harpers Ferry. They started by burning forts in Indian Country such as Fort Gibson, but even burned small towns, including, by the end of July, Tahlequah, Creek Agency, Muskogee, and the land around Tallasi. In July, western Union Militia and Federal Cavalry arrived to protect the Forts and towns in Kansas, and a number of skirmishes broke out.

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Sun Apr 17, 2016 10:27 am

General Lyon, in the meantime, followed confederate forces south and west towards Springfield. On August 12, just outside of Springfield, they caught up with a detachment of forces believed to be those under Shelby he had met July 10th and charge into what they believed were a disorganized rear guard. Instead of meeting with Shelby's troops, they met with a new force under General Magruder, just arrived from the suburbs of Richmond. Magruder led the McIntosh Brigade, but was unable to maintain order, and his forces fled. in an effort to protect his rear, four companies of the 1st Missouri regiment of cavalry were captured and the remaining 6 killed or otherwise disorganized.

[ATTACH]38396[/ATTACH]

The battle was a disorganized affair, the confederate forces were not, at the outset of the battle, in a unified command structure, particularly the destroyed cavalry unit which was probably detached when it fled Lyon's advance just days earlier. This disorganization may have played an important role in allowing Lyon's tired men to win an offensive battle against an entrenched foe.
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Mon Apr 18, 2016 2:04 pm

Four days later on August 16, Lyon demanded his exhausted forces to take the town, which was being held by 2,000 men, most of whom had not been a part of either of the two previous battles, neither that against Shelby nor Magruder. The confederates did not have a general officer still on the field, and lost at least one entire regiment from a light brigade from Arkansas in fighting that evening, but held out. Lyon's exhausted forces then made camp for a siege and set out securing the area to receive supplies from the new depot in Jefferson City. There were rumors that Magruder's forces were gathering to the West and would soon arrive to attempt to reclaim control of the area.

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Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:07 am

On September 1, 1861, Butler finished securing Fort Morgan with the aid of C. P. Stone leading the 1st Maryland brigade. In the battle, he captured half of the Fort Morgan garrison, the rest were casualties or fled into the swamps.

On September 2, 1861, Magruder, combined with the forces of Shelby which Lyon had faced earlier returned to Lyon's front at the head of 8,500 men against Lyon's 13,300. Lyon's men were decently entrenched by this time and easily withstood the assault, particularly due to the work of Vandever's brigade which was personally led by Lyon. Magruder was at the head of the McIntosh Brigade, Thompson led the Bowen Brigade and Shelby now led Weightman's. Along with the McIntosh Brigade, Rives' Cavalry Regiment and Reids's Horse Artillery, along with two irregular cavalry regiments from the far west were new confederate forces brought to bear. The Union was led, in part, by three new brigades, Vandever's, Sigel's, and the 6th Missouri Brigade led by Lyon, Morrell, and Wood respectively. The 6th Missouri under Wood was also particularly effective.

The forces in the east were asked at this time to consider offensive activity to pull attention away from the Atlantic coast in preparation for an invasion along Hampton Roads with a goal to retake Norfolk. A large force of two divisions was organizing in New England under General's Hooker and Meager which would make this advance and the Chesapeake Scouting Squadron was in the harbor keeping an eye on the Norfolk. At the same time, a small reconnaissance force was sent from Harpers Ferry towards Leesburg and Ball's Bluff under General Howe. Such a complicated plan was considered feasible due to the ultimate success in multiple columns in West Virginia combining at Clarksburg and eventually following confederate forces under General Floyd south towards Covington, where the Confederate forces were by then encamped across the Greenbriar River from Union forces under General Hamilton.

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Milroy's forces of 24,000 reached Johnston's front outside of Winchester on September 11. The 3rd and 6th Brigades of the NVA made the main charges in the ensuing battle. Milroy lost 4,300 men, while Johnston lost only 1,700 of his force of about 11,600. The battle was considered a Union tactical victory, but was strategically unclear as Johnston's forces were not forced to leave their rearmost entrenchments. General Bee leading Bee's brigade and General Winder leading Bartow's brigade of Johnston's force performed extremely well.

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tripax
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Tue Apr 19, 2016 10:15 pm

In late September, Lyon consolidated his hold on Springfield, capturing the city and its militia garrison in its entirety. He also destroyed the Arkansas light infantry brigade, a total of 1290 confederates while losing only 123 men when the 2nd Missouri Brigade charged prematurely. Lyon, Morrell, and Wood all performed excellently. On the 30th of September, Magruder returned to the area attacking Lyon's force with materially the same force as earlier in the month, totaling now 7,600 men against Lyon's now 13,500 men - having replaced his losses in a ratio of almost 1:1. Lyon won this battle as well, losing about 1,300 men to Magruder's 1,100. Magruder's McIntosh brigade faced particularly troubling losses.

Slightly further west, General Edwin Sumner defended Fort Baxter in southeast Kansas against a savage attack by General Watie. Sumner fought with 2,900 men against Watie's 1,000 Cherokee and irregulars. Sumner was tragically among the 276 Union and 169 confederate solders who died in the Union victory.

Even further West, another band of confederate irregulars charged through Kansas and across the front range of Colorado to Golden City.

In the months of August, September, and October, General McClernand led a campaign that was, in its plans, known as the Memphis Campaign. In this campaign he led about 10,000 men south towards New Madrid Missouri when he ran into a similarly sized force under General Polk. Polk personally led the 1st Tennessee Brigade in a series of battles. Each battle was quite small, but McClernand uniformly came out the loser. By late September, McClernand was retreating having already lost over 1,000 casualties.

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General Halleck awaited McClernand's return in Cairo where he had gathered over 20,000 men along with General's Lew Wallace and Carl Schurz, whose successes in West Virginia had given national renown as well as General Nelson who led a division of Kentuckians. Another general, Grant, was there as well. Grant had led a force from Cairo to Charlston, Missouri as a mere Colonel, securing that area in advance of McClernand's failed campaign. Now Grant held the two-star rank of Major-General and great things were expected from the Mexican War Veteran.
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Thu Apr 21, 2016 2:21 pm

In early October, Virginia was a hotbed of activity. The naval invasion of Norfolk was a resounding success, with Joe Hooker leading the land forces and Farragut leading the Naval portion. But Harpers Ferry was captured by confederate forces. Winfield Scott was asked to step down in his role and McClellan was appointed Commander in Chief of all Union Armies. McDowell's general success in Virginia suggested him for the position, but the second loss of Harpers Ferry precluded such a promotion over the more senior McClellan. Further West, the reorganization included the promotion of General Lyon to three-stars, full General. Hooker's success in the Norfolk invasion will likely lead to his promotion as well.

The combined attack on Norfolk was one of the most impressive naval attacks of all time. The coordination of forces has already been discussed, with Floyd held in the West, Beauregard and Joe Johnston in the north, and a small force securing Richmond under Cooper and Lee. Indeed, Milroy's move down the Shenandoah Valley uncovered Harpers Ferry, which was attacked by a large portion of Beauregard's Army moving from Manassas. While this move did not put the Union in a great position, the largest confederate force in Virginia was left separated from the main southern rail networks and unable to move quickly to counter Hooker's landing.

The landing was preceded by three naval engagements. First the Potomac Squadron had approached Norfolk to scout from sea, confirming the lack of an organized or large defense force. However, the Potomac did discover the defensive capabilities in the fort, and the Barbarian, Theodore, and USS Pawnee were all sunk, destroying the entire Squadron. Over the following days, five Atlantic Blockade Squadrons and another blockade squadron from New York arrived along the Hampton Roads Coast and bombarded the defences at Norfolk. In the engagement, Union ships took at least 62 direct hits, but dealt a significant number of hits of their own, with at least 46 landing directly among confederate cannon and garrison. A third naval maneuver was under Farragat who arrived off the coast of Cape Henry ready to counter and challenge to the Union landing - but no challenge arrived. When Hooker landed, he did not find significant artillery left in Norfolk - it had either been destroyed or removed in advance of the Union landing. This attack had thus been one of the first modern examples of Naval forces not only overwhelming a land defense but destroying entire batteries. Hooker's force destroyed entirely two militia garrison regiments and severely maimed a three regiment brigade of Virginia infantry which may not have survived the retreat as a fighting force. Officially, Hooker's 16,300 men defeated a garrison of 2,800 with both sides losing about 1,400 men. However, this does not include about 350 Union sailors who lost their lives in the naval bombardment. It also does not include the 1,000 additional Virginia infantrymen captured or killed during the retreat. And neither the casualty figures nor the estimates of confederates engaged count the perhaps 200-400 men serving confederate artillery which had disappeared when Hooker arrived.

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Before the engagement, a confederate ironclad was rumored to have just finished building in Norfolk and floated upriver to Richmond. In the capture of Harpers Ferry, Thoburn's Brigade was captured in its entirety with no loss to the enemy. The brigade was not yet fully filled out, and only about 800 men were lost.

[ATTACH]38475[/ATTACH]
[Note that while 28 hits were lost, only 14 hits were captured. So while my force did not fight, half of the losses are counted as casualties and half as captured soldiers, at least that is how it looks to me.]
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Fri Apr 22, 2016 1:56 pm

In late October, General Beauregard abandoned his raid on Harpers Ferry, while General Milroy attempted to move north into Harpers Ferry. On October 21, General Milroy force moving north and west skirmished with Beauregard's force moving south and east in the outskirts of Winchester. Outnumbered, Milroy's forces retreated, and Bearegard continued his march, arriving in his former entrenchments around Manassas.

[ATTACH]38504[/ATTACH]

In the West, General Shelby's cavalry division attacked General Ashboth around Fort Baxter, pushing Ashboth northeast to Fort Scott. In spite of the victory, Shelby's force was short on supplies and was unable to engage, let alone defeat the garrison of Kansas Militia inside of the Fort.

[ATTACH]38505[/ATTACH]

General Hamilton did not stay idle in southern West Virginia, moving across the Greenbriar River and into Virginia where he met Floyd's former command, now led as a division by General Smith, Floyd having moved to a command elsewhere. Hamilton defeated that general in the Battle of Covington. This defeat was the next skirmish in a general plan that was started with Hooker's invasion of Norfolk earlier in the Month and continued with the consolodation of the Army of Northeast Virginia under McDowel and Milroy's force. That plan is described below, for better or worse.

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In late October of 1861, with winter fast approaching, McClellan took personal command of a new Army of the Potomac with divisions under Howe and Tyler organizing in Alexandria. These forces would be asked to defend the capital while forces elsewhere sought to crush Virginia. Beauregard's raid in force on Harpers Ferry, while successful, was abandoned and his army returned to the area around Manasses. But his presence in Harpers Ferry and threat to move further into Union territory forced the Northeast Virginia Army under McDowell to consolidate in Harpers Ferry. When Beauregard left, rather than sending his divisions back to the Alexandria defenses, McDowell moved towards Milroy, who remained in Winchester. General Hamilton moved in from the West into southwestern Virginia, his force ordered first to follow and destroy General Smith's force. Hamilton's thrust was also meant to injure Johnston's hopes in Winchester of holding the valley of Shenandoah - Union command expected Johnston to either retreat towards New Market, Staunton, or Charlottesville allowing Hamilton and McDowell to consider coordinated efforts against Johnston and whatever remained of Smith's force. Further East, Hooker had moved into Suffolk and now sat opposite the Blackwater River from a small force under Bushrod Johnson. Expectations were not great for Johnson's force, but Hooker was not adequately supplied and his forces were exhausted. Even so, Hooker's promotion to Major General was ordered, and Butler was expected to return from the Outer Islands of North Carolina to lead the defenses of Norfolk. If Johnson was not adequately supported, Hooker was expected to threaten a march towards Petersburg or City Point. At this point, however, Hooker's lines of supply and retreat from such a move were not clearly defended and his position could become greatly exposed.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Fri Apr 22, 2016 5:07 pm

In the West, Shelby's force, while recently victorious in Fort Baxter, was forced to retreat towards Fayetteville during November of 1861. Fayetteville, however, was not necessarily a secure destination as Lyon had followed Magruder into the area. Lyon had about 15,500 men under divisions led by Morell and Wood against 11,100 men in divisions led by Magruder himself and by Watie. Lyon was not victorious in the first skirmish between the two forces November 14, but remained in the region.

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In the East, Beauregard continued to thrash about, this time moving on Leesburg new Balls Bluff where General Hunter had made a reconnaissance in force moving south from McDowell's Army, now in Winchester.

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By the middle of the month, a small reserve force under General Runyon was in Harpers Ferry and Johnston had retreated to Strasburg from the advance of McDowell. Thus it was that for the first time, a large Confederate Army had been beaten in the East, although McDowell had no battle to show for it.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:18 am

In late November, plans in Arkansas and Virginia stalled out. Lyon was unable to dislodge the combined and combining forces in Fayetteville and would eventually be forced to push his way out and back towards Springfield.

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In the Shenandoah, McDowell marched on Strasburg where he lost two battles, with casualties exceptionally heavy in Burnsides' and Porter's divisions, forcing his retreat back to Winchester.

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Hooker won a small battle in Sussex County, Virginia, but was not likely to follow up his movement.

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One bright spot exists on the Mississippi, where General Grant began his march down the Mississippi. Respecting Kentucky's neutrality, the general was given orders in late November to bypass that state and to recapture Island 10 with two divisions. From there, he would be able to either march towards Memphis or towards Nashville. There were rumors of large Armies in both places, however. On the other hand, two more divisions of reserves were training in Cairo and would be able to join him when they were ready.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Wed Apr 27, 2016 10:42 am

[I'm sorry I haven't kept the depth I'd like, my schedule has gotten very tight and looks to continue to be so for the near future, so I'll likely continue to be terse for the rest of this game.]

In early January, 1862, the Confederate counterattack in the Shenandoah continued, with a march on Winchester led by Holmes and including General Longstreet. Milroy's weary boys were badly beaten and retreated south towards McDowell, ignoring their base at Harpers Ferry.

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In the West, Grant faced his first large fight, beating a force under Albert Sidney Johnson which he outnumbered more than two to one. In spite of the victory, Grant took heavy losses, especially in Schulz' division.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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Gray Fox
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Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:58 pm

Grant needs an artillery Division. Every offensive should have one. Good luck!
I'm the 51st shade of gray. Eat, pray, Charge!

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tripax
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Thu Apr 28, 2016 6:56 am

Gray Fox wrote:Grant needs an artillery Division. Every offensive should have one. Good luck!


You are right. I don't quite have the money right now. I like to build divisions as fast as division generals arrive and I like to have a few Ironclads around (more on them later), so I don't do artillery like I should.
Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Thu Apr 28, 2016 7:09 am

In the West, Admiral Porter has arrived with a flotilla of five ironclads. These are important because Admiral Semmes had attempted to close the Mississippi south of and including Island 10 from Union use, greatly reducing union ability to reinforce Grant.

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In Virginia, what had been called the Virginia anaconda turned into the Virginia earthworm, as all forces slunk back towards their starting point.

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Bushrod Johnson now holds the area around Waverley, as General Jackson has marched into the theater and attacked Butler's forces entrenched in the area around Suffolk, arriving about January 30.

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However, McDowell saw an opportunity and moved south from Clarke County, Virginia into Culpeper, defeating a small division under A. P. Stewart. This move puts his force in the rear of Beauregard's force in Manassas. However, McDowell's force consisted of about 24,000 men, while Beauregard's force, now including Stewart consisted of nearly 30,000. McClellan agreed to the move, believing that he could hold Alexandria if need be. Longstreet's forces were in Strasburg and exhausted. And thus as January closed, Virginia was in an extremely tense state.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Sun May 01, 2016 12:44 pm

By April of 1862, a great deal of reorganization occurred. Corps were formed in Virginia, new troops were being trained in Missouri, neutral Kentucky, and New England with Sigel, Halleck, and McClellan moving to new areas. Don Carolos Buel had arrived in West Virginia to take over the attack on Virginia from the West, and Gilbert and Kearney had taken command of important corps along the Mississippi and in the Shenandoah Valley respectively. McDowell's flank of Confederate forces in Mannasses was successful, and the Rapidan was established as the new front in Virginia.

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In the West, before moving back towards Louisville, Henry Hallek moved south from Cairo to Fort Pillow with divisions under General Thomas and General Nelson, but his movements were noticed by General Polk in Memphis, who defended the fort including divisions under Smith and Shelby in a battle on April 1, 1862. Thomas's forces made the deepest advance and took the greatest losses. After the loss, Gilbert was put in command of the corps, although Generals Pope in Grant's command has asked if he can be put in charge of the corps.

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In Suffolk, General Butler's time spent in front of Jackson's force led to great difficulties. Jackson had repeatedly attacked all winter, defeating the small garrison inside of Suffolk, but unable to dislodge Butler and always losing as many casualties as he inflicted, if not more. However, these maneuvers and Pyrrhic victories led to an erosion of Butler's military control, and Butler was unable to continue getting significant supplies from Hampton Roads or Norfolk, and was unable to use the rails (which Jackson had not destroyed). In this state, Jackson attacked in April of 1862. In four attacks across seven days, Jackson's force with divisions under Ewell, DH Hill, Stuart, and Hoke pushed Butler (with divisions under Hooker, Meagher, and Stone) to the edge. In each individual engagement, except the last, Jackson lost slightly more troops than Butler. However, Butler's resolve and his supplies did not hold out and Butler began a retreat into the swamps. In response, the force is being trained in New England has been earmarked for duty along the Coast and which may save Butler yet, but little hope is held for this outcome. Butler's force retreated south towards Edenton, but would remain in the swamps for weeks.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Tue May 03, 2016 10:10 am

[Sorry about the double images in the previous post.]

In order to move more quickly, Butler split his force into a corps under Hooker with two divisions, and himself leading the division under Stone. Jackson followed Butler to Edentown, but did not arrive in an uncontested land. A large force under Admiral Farragut and General Foster arrived in Currituck sound with one full division and two smaller divisions, taking temporary control of Edentown. Hooker took command of this and, expecting Foster to dig in and join forces with Butler, moved south with two small divisions under Generals Alpheus Williams and General Geary. Hooker succeeded in taking Plymouth and Swan Quarter with a goal of securing the rest of the North Carolina Coast.

However, Jackson's force arrived in Edentown before Butler arrived with Stone's division. Butler's disorganization and passive approach on the move were critical. He was unable to confirm Foster's strength and ordered the General to retreat. Although he had numbers and some entrenchments, Foster's forces were still disordered from the sea voyage and, together with Butler's forces, the entire command re-boarded Farragut's ships off the coast.

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June 15, 2016, Lyon again pushed into Fayetteville, again losing. However, weight of numbers were greatly in his favor, and it was expected that Lyon would not retreat again. His force of about 35,000 lost 6,000 men while Magruder's force of 12,000 lost 4,500 including half of his infantry division under Magruder's personal command. General Morell performed significantly well under Lyon.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Tue May 03, 2016 10:23 am

In late June, General Buell moved towards Lexington, first into Millboro where he fought a skirmish against General Holmes.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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tripax
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Wed May 04, 2016 2:53 pm

By the end of July, Henry Halleck's forces in Louisville have been trapped in their camps. General Forrest Marched through Munfordville and fought a skirmish with Halleck's force which has no artillery and was being trained from conscripts. On July 16, Forrest skirmished with Halleck, who has small divisions under Generals Hamilton and Barnes. Halleck had about 9,800 men against Forrest's 5,500, but Forrest's brilliance gave him the field and Halleck remained trapped. Both sides lost about 1,000 men.

General Hindman arrived on July 21, charging his force of cavalry into the camp, losing about 2,000 men while Halleck lost about 1,500 men. That left just under 7,000 Union forces, and Hindman originally had almost 12,000 men and thus the combined forces of Forrest and Hindman may double Halleck's force.

In Western Kentucky and Tennessee, General Pope's Corps has swung around Lee's and Grant's camps, cutting Lee off from his supplies and capturing Decaturville and closing in on Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. This change of base served to put pressure on Forrest's forces in Northern Kentucky as well as giving Lee a number of bad options to pick from. A division of Cavalry under General Walker moved from Fort Henry into Paducah, capturing the garrison of that town at the same time a division of Union Cavalry under General William F. Smith under the command of General Gilbert took Columbus and just missed Walker's force.

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In Virginia in an apparent error, General Jackson has moved by rail from his victory at Norfolk to the Shanendoah Valley, joining Longstreet there. General Butler moved spent a few weeks in Atlantic City and planned to return to a now poorly defended Norfolk where he could rejoin with Hooker, who was moving back towards Norfolk/Edentown. Jackson arrived in the front of General Kearney's camps near the last day of the month. The two lines were very close, but Kearney had total control of the area and it was likely that a fight would break out between them on the first few days of the next month - although Jackson left open a possibility of a quick, passive retreat. Union forces had control of the Manassas Gap rail lines through Clarke county, and General McDowell's Army and General Franklin's Corps were ordered to move into Shanendoah. Further, they were ordered to continue on, Franklin to Strasburg and McDowell to New Market. In this way, over 80,000 Union forces were committed to move into regions where they could fight between 40,000 and 60,000 Confederates, defending on the sizes of Longstreet's and Jackson's corps and if nearby forces under General Ruggles and General Holmes could get involved. General Buell remained in Millboro, Virginia on the West Virginia border and was being joined by a small cavalry division now under General W.H.L. Wallace and another small force coming from Connecticut. This force put pressure on both of these generals and reduced the ease of Jackson and Longstreet to potentially retreat to the South West.

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Across the South, we have a deep appreciation of history -- we haven’t always had a deep appreciation of each other’s history. - Reverend Clementa Pinckney

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