Farfarer2
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War of 1812-14

Wed Feb 13, 2008 4:20 am

A good reference and a very good read is Pierre Berton's " The Invasion of Canada" and "Flames across the Border", a two volume set. They are likely translated into french given that he was a very popular Canadian author.

The books give particular insight into Leader attributes, the quality of individual units and city/town/fort capabilties/capacities - all very germane to the game scenario.

(Another book on the naval side is Barry Gough's "Through Fire and Ice". the story of the sloop (schooner?) NANCY. )

Quite good stories of Trafalgar vets fighting on Lake Erie, the variety of militia quality, the role of the Indians (and for many tribes/tribe groups, their independent foreign policy).

Finally, in the popular culture, perhaps only two people are remembered, both women, and both for the Candy and Baked treats companies: Dolly Madison (USA, president's wife, baked snacks) and Laura Secord ( wonderful chocolates, heroine of Lundy's Lane). Gen Winfield Scott ( a young officer) later went on to great things and a long career in the USA.

Other tidbits: Zebulon Pike, first to plant a Stars and Stripes west of the Mississippi ( in Iowa), who named Pike's Peak in Colorado ( as Captain Pike ) and died as a General in the battle of York ( now Toronto ).

HMS ST LAWRENCE, being built at Kingston, would have been one of the largest in the Royal Navy. If you go to Navy Bay, on a sunny day, the ribs of the scuttled vessels from the Rush-Bagot treaty are still visible in the murk ( well at least they were in the 70's).
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Heldenkaiser
AGEod Grognard
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Mon Feb 18, 2008 4:56 pm

Farfarer2 wrote:HMS ST LAWRENCE, being built at Kingston, would have been one of the largest in the Royal Navy.


Was, I believe. She was completed, only to be decommissioned right after the war. The real oddity about her being of course that she was the only first-rate ever to be built exclusively for a fresh-water existence, as she could never have left the Great Lakes. :)

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Le Ricain
Posts: 3284
Joined: Sun Apr 09, 2006 12:21 am
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland

Tue Feb 19, 2008 2:08 am

Farfarer2 wrote:A good reference and a very good read is Pierre Berton's " The Invasion of Canada" and "Flames across the Border", a two volume set. They are likely translated into french given that he was a very popular Canadian author.

The books give particular insight into Leader attributes, the quality of individual units and city/town/fort capabilties/capacities - all very germane to the game scenario.

(Another book on the naval side is Barry Gough's "Through Fire and Ice". the story of the sloop (schooner?) NANCY. )

Quite good stories of Trafalgar vets fighting on Lake Erie, the variety of militia quality, the role of the Indians (and for many tribes/tribe groups, their independent foreign policy).

Finally, in the popular culture, perhaps only two people are remembered, both women, and both for the Candy and Baked treats companies: Dolly Madison (USA, president's wife, baked snacks) and Laura Secord ( wonderful chocolates, heroine of Lundy's Lane). Gen Winfield Scott ( a young officer) later went on to great things and a long career in the USA.

Other tidbits: Zebulon Pike, first to plant a Stars and Stripes west of the Mississippi ( in Iowa), who named Pike's Peak in Colorado ( as Captain Pike ) and died as a General in the battle of York ( now Toronto ).

HMS ST LAWRENCE, being built at Kingston, would have been one of the largest in the Royal Navy. If you go to Navy Bay, on a sunny day, the ribs of the scuttled vessels from the Rush-Bagot treaty are still visible in the murk ( well at least they were in the 70's).


Of course, Dolley Madison was the President's wife and Dolly Madison is the US bakery brand.

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'Nous voilà, Lafayette'

Colonel C.E. Stanton, aide to A.E.F. commander John 'Black Jack' Pershing, upon the landing of the first US troops in France 1917

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