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Thread: War of 1812 US Regiments

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    Default War of 1812 US Regiments

    REGULAR US ARMY

    US ARMY June 18, 1812

    Infantry

    1st US
    2nd US
    3rd US
    4th US
    5th US
    6th US
    7th US
    8th US
    9th US
    10th US
    11th US
    12th US
    23th US
    14th US
    15th US
    16th US
    17th US

    1st US Rifle Regiment

    1st US Artillery
    2nd US Artillery
    3rd US Artillery
    4th US Artillery

    1st US Light Dragoons
    2nd US Light Dragoons

    6 Independent Companies of Rangers

    REGIMENTS ADDED LATE JUNE 1812


    18th US
    19th US
    20th US
    21st US
    22nd US
    23rd US
    24th US
    25th US

    REGIMENTS ADDED JANUARY 29, 1813

    26th US
    27th US
    28th US
    29th US
    30th US
    31st US
    32nd US
    33rd US
    34th US
    35th US
    36th US
    37th US
    38th US
    39th US
    40th US
    41st US
    42st US
    43rd US
    44th US
    45th US
    46th US

    REGIMENTS ADDED ON FEBRUARY 25, 1813

    10 Additional companies of Rangers


    REGIMENTS ADDED IN FEBRUARY 1814

    2nd Rifle Regiment
    3rd Rifle Regiment
    4th Rifle Regiment

    MARCH 30, 1814

    1st and 2nd US light Dragoons merged
    1st-3rd US Artillery become the "Corps of Artillery"

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    Captain WIA Beta Alumnus muddymonkey77's Avatar
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    MASSACHUSETTS MILITIA

    General Jacob Bliss' Command
    Miscellaneous Artillery Companies


    Captain Samuel Stall's Company under General Goodwin
    Captain Edward Jacob's Company under General Goodwin
    Captain Ebenezer Dyer's Company, General Wells' Command
    Captain J. E. Smith's Company, General Wells' Command
    Captain Jonathan Thaxter's Company, General Wells' Command.

    Lieutenant Colonel William Edwards' Regiment of Artillery
    Miscellaneous Artillery Companies


    Captain Reuben Brown's Company, Lieut. Col. S. K. Chamberlain's Regiment
    Major B. T. Reed's Battalion of Artillery
    Captain George Sullivan's Company of Artillery under Supervision of Commodore
    William Bainbridge

    Major James Lewis' Battalion of Artillery
    Miscellaneous Artillery Companies


    Captain Joseph S. Sayward's Company of Artillery, Lieut. Col. J. Appleton's Regiment
    Capt. Jesse Putnam's Company, Lieut. Col. J. Russell's Regiment
    Capt. Isaac Lane's Company of Artillery, Lieut. Col. B. Lincoln's Regiment

    Lieutenant Colonel James Appleton's Regiment
    Miscellaneous Companies


    Captain Benjamin. Haskell's Detached Company under General Hovey
    Captain Moses Whittier's Company, Maj. R. Elwell's Regiment

    Lieutenant Colonel E. Hale's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel P. Merrill's Regiment
    Colonel Reed's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Amos Binney's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Solomon K. Chamberlin's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Levi Dodge's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Dudley's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Enos Foot's Regiment
    Miscellaneous Companies


    Captain Enos Goss' Detached Company of Mendon, Lieut. Col. W. Hasting's Regiment.
    Captain Thomas Harrington's Roll of Detached Company of Shrewsbury and Vicinity, Lieut. Col. Walter Hastings Regiment.

    Lieutenant Colonel Caleb Howard's Regiment
    Miscellaneous Companies


    Captain Nathaniel Wilder's Company, under Gen. Goodwin's Command

    Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Lincoln's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Longley's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Messinger's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel David Nye's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel B. Noye's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Peter Osgood's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Page's Regiment
    Major General Alford Richardson's Division & Brigade Staff
    Artillery Battalions


    Captain Jacob Auld's Company
    Major Alden Blossom's Battalion
    Major Joseph Chandler's Battalion
    Major Daniel Holden's Battalion
    Other Companies Attached to Other Regiments:
    Captain Cornelius Barnes' Company
    Captain Phineas Varnum's Company
    Captain Josephus Howard's Company
    Captain Jonathan Bemis' Company
    Captain Leonard Richmond's Company
    Major James Steele's Battalion
    Other Companies Attached to Other Regiments:
    Captain Dean Bangs' Company
    Captain William Haskell's Company
    Captain Isaac Leighton's Company
    Lieutenant Seth S. Fairfield's Company
    Captain Edward Small's Company

    Cavalry Battalions

    Major B. Ames' Battalion
    Major Thomas McCrate's Battalion
    Major Peter Grant's Battalion
    Major John Greenwood's Battalion
    Captain William B. Bray's Company of Cavalry
    Sergt. A. Lemond's Detachment of Cavalry, acting as Express

    Lieutenant Colonel Oliver Shead's Regiment
    Captain Joshua Chamberlain's Detached Company of Militia
    Lieutenant Colonel John Black's Regiment
    Colonel M. Nichol's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel William R. Blaisdell's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel John Burbank's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Cyrus Clark's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel John Commings' Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Ezekiel Cutter's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Robert Day's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Erastus Foot's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph E. Foxcroft's Regiment
    General John Blake's Brigade
    Lieutenant Colonel A. Grant's Regiment
    Col. A. Hastings' Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Josiah Hobb's Regiment
    Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Hollands' Regiment


    Lieutenant Colonel W. Ryerson's Regiment

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    Apart from the regiments authorized in June 1812 (as war was being declared) there were another 10 authorized in January 1812. So only the 1st to 7th regiments were actually veteran regulars, the rest were all being drafted in 1812. Most were far below establishment and extremely green. Throughout 1812 their leaders considered the militia to be the better soldiers.

    What's up with the Massachusetts militia? I thought that none of the New England states allowed their militia to serve in the war. I do know that all invasions of Quebec had to start from the west side of Lake Champlain, because the New York militia were available and the Vermont militia were not.

    Some more OOBs

    New York State Militia OOB
    1st brigade, GERARD STEDDIFORD of the city of New York
    -1st regiment, Beekman M. Van Buren, of the city of New York
    -2d regiment , Jonas Mapes, of the city of New York
    -3d regiment, John Ditmas, of Jamaica, Queens County.
    2d brigade, REUBEN HOPKINS, of Goshen, Orange County
    -4th regiment, Abraham J. Hardenbergh, of Shawangunk, Ulster County
    -5th regiment, Martin Heermance, of Rhinebeck, Duchess County;
    -6th regiment, Abraham Van Wyck, of Fishkill, Duchess County.
    3d brigade , MICAJAH PETERS, of Queensbury, Washington County;
    -7th regiment, James Green, of Argyle, Washington County;
    -8th, Thomas Miller, of Plattsburg, Clinton County
    -9th, Peter I. Vosburgh, of Kinderhook, Columbia County.
    4th brigade, RICHARD DODGE, of Johnstown, Montgomery County (
    -10th regiment, John Prior, of Greenfield, Saratoga County
    -11th, Calvin Rich, of Sharon, Schoharie County, to be attached to the regiments from General Veeder’s division
    -12th, John T. Van Dalfsen, of Coeyman’s, Albany County,
    -13th, Putnam Farrington, of Delhi, Delaware County, to be attached to the regiments from General Todd’s division.
    5th brigade, JACOB BROWN, of Brownsville, Jefferson County
    -14th regiment, William Stone, of Whitestown, Oneida County
    -15th, Thomas B. Benedict, of De Kalb, St. Lawrence County.
    6th brigade, DANIEL MILLER, of Homer, Cortland County
    -16th regiment, Farrand Stranahan, of Cooperstown, Otsego County;
    -17th, Thomas Mead, of Norwich, Chenango County.
    7th brigade, WILLIAM WADSWORTH, of Geneseo, Ontario County;
    -18th regiment, Hugh W. Dobbin, of Junius, Seneca County;
    -19th, Henry Bloom, of Geneva, Cayuga County;
    -20th, Peter Allen, of Bloomfield, Ontario County.
    8th brigade, GEORGE M‘CLURE, of Bath, Steuben County.
    -the regiment of light infantry under Colonel Jeremiah Johnson, of Brooklyn, Kings County,
    -regiment of riflemen under Colonel Francis M‘Clure, of the city of New York.
    -the corps commanded by Lieutenant Colonels Swift, Flemming, and Bellinger, were subject to his division orders."

    Hull's army
    At the outbreak of war Hull was in modern Toledo Ohio with:
    4th US infantry, the
    1st Ohio militia
    2nd Ohio militia
    3rd Ohio militia,
    he recruited a small group of volunteers in Michigan. This is the army that Hull surrendered to Brock.

    Queenston
    At the battle of Queenston Heights in 1812 Stephen Van Rensselaer commanded:
    Smythe's Brigade
    6th US Infantry,
    13th US Infantry
    23rd U.S. Infantry
    Brigadier Wadsworth's Brigade
    16th New York militia
    17th New York militia
    Brigadier Miller's Brigade
    18th New York militia
    19th New York militia
    20th New York militia
    The militia were generally the superior troops at this stage of the war, as they had at least been drilled.

    Niagara Border
    By November 1812 the forces on the Niagara frontier were

    6th US Infantry,
    12th US Infantry
    13th US Infantry
    14th US Infantry
    20th US Infantry
    23rd U.S. Infantry (14th and 23rd combined into one as they were so far behind in recruiting)
    The Baltimore Volunteers under Colonel Winder,
    Captain Gibson’s Artillery; Captain Towson’s Artillery; Captain Barker’s and Captain Branch’s Artillery; Captain Archer’s Artillery;
    General Tannehill’s Infantry,
    The Pennsylvania Volunteers
    the Infantry of Colonel Swift (ind)
    NY militia 8th Brigade Colonel M‘Clure (NY light infantry, NY riflemen)
    General Porter’s Infantry, The New York Volunteers
    Captain Leonard’s Artillery;
    Various components of the US rifle regiment.

    NorthWestern Army
    Harrison's army that drove the British from the Northwest territory in 1813 was:
    Northwestern Army, WH Harrison Commanding
    Left Wing, Brig. General James Winchester
    Brig General John Payne, KY milita
    1st Ky regiment
    4th Ky regiment
    5th KY regiment
    1st KY Rifle Regiment
    Col. Samuel Wells USA
    17 US Infantry
    Det. 19th US Regiment
    2nd KY milita
    Center Wing, Brig Gen Edward Tupper OH militia
    OH mounted militia brigade
    KY regiment
    KY Mounted Regiment
    Right Wing, WH Harrison
    Brigadier Gen, Simon Perkins
    Ohio Militia Regiment
    Virginia Brigade
    2nd PA Brigade
    1st regiment
    2nd regiment
    KY dragoons
    US 2nd light dragoons
    19th US Infantry
    Pittsburgh Blues Volunteers

    York
    At York (Toronto) in April 1813 US OOB was
    Henry Dearborn
    Zebulon Pike †
    6th Regiment US Infantry
    15th Regiment US Infantry,
    16th Regiment US Infantry
    21st Regiments of U.S. Infantry
    one company from the 3rd Regiment of U.S. Artillery
    one company from the Regiment of U.S. Rifles.
    elements from the 5th, 14th and 29th Regiments of U.S. Infantry

    Fort George
    The OOB at Fort George in May was similar:
    Henry Dearborn
    Winfield Scott
    Detachment 2 Lt Dragoons;
    detachment Lt Art;
    detachmentss 2 & 3 Art;
    detachment 1 Rifles;
    6th US Infantry,
    14th US Infantry,
    15th Infantry,
    16th Infantry,
    20th Infantry,
    22nd Infantry,
    23rd Infantry.

    St Lawrence
    At Chrysler's Farm in October the OOB was
    James Wilkinson
    John P. Boyd
    3rd Brigade Leonard Covington
    -9th US Infantry
    -16th US Infantry
    -25th U.S. Infantry
    4th Brigade, Robert Swartwout
    -11th U.S. Infantry
    -14th U.S. Infantry
    -21st U.S. Infantry
    1st Brigade, Isaac Coles
    -12th U.S. Infantry
    -13th U.S. Infantry
    one squadron of the 2nd Dragoons
    1 coy 1 Rifles.

    Chippewa
    At Chippewa in July 1814
    Jacob Brown Commanding
    * 1st Brigade : Brigadier General Winfield Scott
    o 9th/22nd Infantry : (550 Veteran)
    o 11th Infantry : (400 Veteran)
    o 25th Infantry : (350 Veteran)
    o 21st Infantry : Company (50 Line)

    * 2nd Brigade : Brigadier General Eleazer W. Ripley
    o 21st Infantry : (600 Line)
    o 23rd Infantry : (350 Line)

    * 3rd Brigade : Brigadier General Peter B. Porter
    o 5th Pennsylvania (Militia) Regt : (500 Line)
    o Seneca, Oneida, Cayuga Indian Allies (300 Native-SK)

    * Artillery : Capt. Nathan Towson, U.S. Artillery Corps
    o Foot Artillery (Towson) : (2-6pdr, 1-5.5inch howitzer)
    o Foot Artillery (Ritchie): (2-6pdr, 1-5.5inch howitzer)
    o Foot Artillery (Biddle) with Ripley : (1-12pdr)

    * Cavalry : Capt. Samuel D. Harris
    o U.S. Light Dragoons : Troop (80)


    At the end of July 1814 at Lundy's Lane (slight differences)
    Left Division (Major General Jacob Brown)

    * 1st Brigade (Brigadier General Winfield Scott)
    o 9th U.S. Infantry
    o 11th U.S. Infantry
    o 22nd U.S. Infantry
    o 25th U.S. Infantry
    o Towson's Company U.S. Artillery (Two 6-pounder guns, One 5.5-inch howitzer)
    * 2nd Brigade (Brigadier General Eleazer Wheelock Ripley)
    o 21st U.S. Infantry
    o 23rd U.S.Infantry
    o 1st U.S. Infantry (part)
    + 17th U.S.Infantry (detachment)
    + 19th U.S. Infantry (detachment)
    * 3rd (Militia) Brigade (Brigadier General Peter Porter)
    o 5th Pennsylvania Militia
    o New York Militia Volunteers
    o Canadian Volunteers (approx. 1 company)
    * U.S. Artillery (Lieutenant Colonel Jacob Hindman)
    o Ritchie's Company (Two 6-pounder guns, One 5.5-inch howitzer)
    o Biddle's Company (Three 12-pounder guns)
    * Cavalry (Captain Samuel D. Harris)
    o Detachment U.S. Dragoons
    o Troop New York Volunteer Dragoons


    At Cook's Mills October 1814
    Commander, Left Division, U.S. Army: Major General George Izard
    o Brigadier General Daniel Bissell
    + 5th Infantry
    + 14th Infantry
    + 15th Infantry
    + 16th Infantry
    + 1st Regt Riflemen : 4th Company
    + U.S. Light and New York Volunteer Dragoons :

    Champlain
    At Plattsburgh in November 1814
    Alexander Macomb
    Detach Corps of Art
    Detach Lt Art;
    4 US Infantry
    13 US Infantry
    29 US Infantry
    30 US Infantry
    31 US Infantry
    33 US Infantry
    34 US Infantry
    4 coys 6 Infantry
    detach 1 Rifles.
    which amount to 1500 regulars. He also had some 1900 militia that I haven't identified, presumably they were New York militia. I have to believe that they included the 3rd New York Brigade as listed above.

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    Great stuff !

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    What's up with the Massachusetts militia? I thought that none of the New England states allowed their militia to serve in the war. I do know that all invasions of Quebec had to start from the west side of Lake Champlain, because the New York militia were available and the Vermont militia were not.
    I was working State By state, and Massachusetts was the first one I finished. The regiments existed, and therefore should be relevant. In game terms, they could be locked in the state. A deterrent for England to attack.

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    We can even add more deterrent, by scripting events that would check an English invasion of NE...if so, the backlash would be even stronger than unlocking the militias (IIRC, New England did not support the war...if invaded, more effort, both industrial and maritime could be done ther...)

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    That is awesome!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilThib View Post
    We can even add more deterrent, by scripting events that would check an English invasion of NE...if so, the backlash would be even stronger than unlocking the militias (IIRC, New England did not support the war...if invaded, more effort, both industrial and maritime could be done ther...)
    But be careful. The British did in fact conquer all of Maine east of the Penobscot river. That didn't unlock the Massachusetts militia, even though that's obviously part of Massachusetts in 1814.

    And in New England there was a quid pro quo. There were hordes of American privateers during the war but they didn't operate from New England. The reason the British went after Baltimore is that it was the top port for privateers.

    To me the war east of New York/Montreal is singularly uninteresting. I'm not sure that you add much by making any of it playable. Historically the British would have been incredibly foolish to attack New England (outside of Maine).

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    Default Eastern Canada Participated

    The Light Company of the 104th New Brunswick Regiment marched more than 700 miles up through the Madawaska River and the Great Portage and wilderness between lake Temiscouata and Rivire du Loup (even today when you drive it you better have have Satellite Radio - last month all I got was "All Bee Gees", with queboecois commentary, all day, on the one radio station (from Cabano or some such). Most of their forced march was in the dead of winter , on snowshoes, pulling tobaggans. On April 12, after 52 days, they arrived at Kingston, Upper Canada without losing any of their 600 men. Their numbers were so exagerrated by the time the rumours hit Sackett's Harbour that the US forces elected to attack York instead...
    Farfarer

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilThib View Post
    We can even add more deterrent, by scripting events that would check an English invasion of NE...if so, the backlash would be even stronger than unlocking the militias (IIRC, New England did not support the war...if invaded, more effort, both industrial and maritime could be done ther...)

    Agree with the theme that ( save for parts of Maine which became a quasi-Indian state), New England wanted no part of a foolish war.
    Farfarer

  11. #11

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    Heh There was also a couple hundred Green Mountain Boys at the Battle of Plattsburg. We just cant miss a good fight. It always makes me happy to see the one unit of vermont militia kicking butt.

    There was also a good reason for using the New York side of the lake, and that was that it was better developed for travel.

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    Question

    I'm a poor researcher at best...

    Any data on the organization of these units? How many companies? Men per company? Grenadiers? Light Infantry?

    ...and what did the British regiments look like by 1812? Same as used in Napoleonic campaigns?

    Thanks ahead of time!
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    Quote Originally Posted by lodilefty View Post
    I'm a poor researcher at best...

    Any data on the organization of these units? How many companies? Men per company? Grenadiers? Light Infantry?

    ...and what did the British regiments look like by 1812? Same as used in Napoleonic campaigns?

    Thanks ahead of time!

    They should look like those in the Napoleon campaign.

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